Title

Associate Professor

Contact Information

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Office: 340G MCKB
Department:
CPSE, CPSE Masters

Teaching Interests

Curriculum and methods for students with mild/moderate disabilities

Interventions for academic at-riskness

Research Interests

Multi-tiered system of supports

Academically at-risk in high school and college

Awards

Selected Publications

IEPs: Writing quality individualized education programs 3rd edition (2016)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Dyches, Tina T

Publication Type: Book, Textbook, Study Guide

Publisher: Pearson

City: Boston

Country: United States

Page Numbers: 128

Secondary teachers’ perceptions of their role in suicide prevention and intervention. (2016)

Authors: Hatton, Victoria; Heath, Melissa Ann; Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Coyne, Sarah Marie; Greg, Hudnall; , Cathy

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Springer

City: New York

Country: USA

Volume: 8

Issue: 1

ISSN: 1866-2625

Abstract: click to view

Teachers are identified as frontline participants in school-based suicide prevention efforts. However, their training and roles in these efforts are often not clearly defined. Because 25 states currently mandate suicide prevention training for teachers and 14 other states encourage this training, teachers’ perceptions about their role in suicide prevention are important to consider. As such, this study assessed secondary teachers’ (N=74) perceptions of their role in suicide prevention, barriers to participating in suicide prevention, and their perceived levels of comfort and confidence in identifying and intervening with suicidal youth. Participating teachers overwhelmingly agreed that they should have a role in suicide prevention. In comparison to untrained teachers, those with previous suicide prevention training were twice as likely to have had a suicidal student or peer of a suicidal student approach them to talk about suicide. Surprisingly, years of teaching were not correlated with teachers’ comfort and confidence in identifying and supporting suicidal youth. Overall, teachers agreed that limited training, fears of making the situation worse, and fears of legal repercussions were barriers that kept teachers from intervening with potentially suicidal students. In order to help teachers effectively perform their gatekeeper role, training efforts must consider teachers’ perceptions, address perceived barriers, and facilitate teacher-student interactions that would increase the likelihood of students coming to teachers for assistance with suicidal concerns. To help schools in providing suicide prevention training for teachers, a list of recommended resources is provided.

IEPs: Writing Quality Individualized Education Programs, Third Edition (2015)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Dyches, Tina T

Publication Type: Book, Textbook

Publisher: Pearson

City: Boston, MA

Country: USA

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 128

ISSN: 978-0133949520

ISBN: 0133949524

URL: www.pearsonhighered.com/educator/product/IEPs-Writing-Quality-Individualized-Education-Programs-3E/9780133949520.page

Abstract: click to view

Here’s practical help for mastering the process of developing and writing quality individualized education programs (IEPs). This best-selling, essential resource includes step-by-step instructions backed by examples, practice, and feedback to help users gain the critical skills and knowledge they need to write effective IEPs, meet the standards of IDEA, and ultimately plan for students with disabilities. Guide to Writing Quality Individualized Education Programs includes an easy-to-understand summary of IDEA 2004; a workable organization of the IEP process into seven manageable steps; explanations, modeling, practice, and feedback for mastering each step of the process; and a brief procedural summary at the end of each step. The new edition features the latest information and references to help readers as they work through the process in such areas as: Recognizing and referencing IEPs for a variety of disabilities, genders, and grade levels. Basing IEPs on required state or core curricula. Phrasing goals that address standards, while also meeting the needs of students performing below-grade level. Understanding the role of Response to Intervention in addressing needs in the general classroom. Learning how the No Child Left Behind Act affects high-stakes testing for students with disabilities. Ideal for teacher candidates, in-service educators, parents and other IEP team members, the guide can be used for whole group instruction, out-of-class assignments, or as independent study.

People with Learning Disabilities (2014)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Textbook

Publisher: Wadsworth

City: Belmont, CA

Country: United States

Issue: 11e

Page Numbers: 152-179

ISBN: 978-1-133-58983-9

URL: www.cengagebrain.com/shop/search/9781133589839

Editors: Lisa Mafrici

Secondary-aged students with learning disabilities self-advocate for accommodations in their general education classrooms (2014)

Authors: Prater, Mary Anne; Redman, Ashleigh ; Anderson, Darlene H; Gibb, Gordon Stanley

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Abstract: click to view

In the general education classroom students with learning disabilities (LD) often need academic accommodations to be successful. These accommodations are typically selected and implemented by their general education teachers, not by the students themselves. High school students with LD were taught to recognize when an accommodation was needed, select the appropriate accommodation, request the accommodation and then implement the accommodation in the general education classroom. To evaluate the effectiveness of the instruction, four students were observed in the general classroom. Results indicated that after receiving instruction students were successful in advocating for themselves in requesting accommodations. Their teachers strongly agreed that students should learn how to advocate for themselves and that the students benefited from the training. The students indicated that they were more successful in their general education classes when they requested accommodations.

Improving outcomes for students with learning disabilities: The application of a problem solving approach (2013)

Authors: Marchant, Michelle; Anderson, Darlene H; Gibb, Gordon Stanley

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Textbook

Volume: 24

Page Numbers: 184-209

Reframing Outcomes for Students with Learning Disabilities: The Application of a Problem-Solving Approach (2013)

Authors: Marchant, Michelle; Anderson, Darlene H; Gibb, Gordon Stanley

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Emerald Group

Volume: 24

Page Numbers: 185-209

Effects of Tiered Training on General Educators' Use of Specific Praise (2012)

Authors: Thompson, MIchele; Marchant, Michelle; Anderson, Darlene H; Prater, Mary Anne; Gibb, Gordon Stanley

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 35

Issue: 4

Page Numbers: 521-547

Organizing an NGO-sponsored English-medium school in south India: Lessons learned (2012)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Journal of International Education and Leadership

City: San Antonio, TX

Country: USA

Volume: 2

Issue: 2

Page Numbers: 1-17

URL: http://www.jielusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/School_in_-India_Gordon_Gibb.pdf

Editors: Osman Ozturgut

Collaborative preteaching of students at risk for academic failure. (2010)

Authors: Munk, JoAnn H; Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Caldarella, Paul

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 45

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 177-185

Guide to writing quality individualized education programs (2007)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Dyches, Tina T

Publication Type: Book, Textbook

Publisher: Allyn and Bacon

City: Needham Heights, MA

Page Numbers: 112

Developing and Evaluating an Inclusion Program for Junior High Students with Disabilities: A Collaborative Team Approach. (1998)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Ingram, Cregg; Dyches, Tina T; Allred, Keith; Egan, M; Young, James

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 33-44

Abstract: click to view

A study investigated perceptions of five junior high general-education teachers and three special education teachers participating on a collaborative inclusion team. Both general and special-education teachers were positive about the inclusion and the teaming and believed the arrangement provided a rich learning environment for students with disabilities.

A Team-Based Junior High Inclusion Program: Parent Perceptions and Feedback (1997)

Authors: Gibb, Gordon Stanley; Young, James; Allred, Keith; Dyches, Tina T; Egan, Merritt Winston; Ingram, C.

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Page Numbers: 243-249, 256

Abstract: click to view

Parent perceptions and attitudes regarding the inclusion of students with mild to moderate disabilities into general classrooms have been mixed. In this qualitative study, the parents of 17 students with learning disabilities and 1 student with behavior disorders were interviewed following the first year of a junior high inclusion pilot program based on teacher and student collaborative teams. Twelve response categories are identified. Parents recognized personal attention for students and positive attributes of teachers as strengths of the program and increased student self-esteem as a positive outcome. The results indicate that the majority of the parents were supportive of the program and wanted it to continue.