Title

Assistant Professor

Contact Information

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Office: 273 MCKB
Department:
CPSE
0

Teaching Interests

Foundations of counseling psychology, counseling/psychotherapy methods and skills, research methods, culture-appropriate and cross-cultural perspectives in counseling.

Research Interests

Cultural perspectives in psychology, culture-appropriate interventions and counseling/psychotherapy process and outcome, religiosity/spirituality, psychological well-being/adjustment, specifically among Polynesians/Polynesian Americans.

http://education.byu.edu/polypsi

Awards

Selected Publications

Racial discrimination and psychological health among Polynesians in the U.S. (2017)

Authors: Allen, Gerald Eldridge; Conklin, Hokulea; Kane, Davis; ,

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

ISSN: 1099-9809

Counseling attitudes and stigma among Polynesian Americans (2016)

Authors: Allen, G. E. Kawika; Smith, Timothy

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Sage

Country: U.S.

Volume: 44

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 6-27

Editors: Lydia Buki

Abstract: click to view

There is a paucity of research on the mental health of Pacific Islanders living in the United States, including those of Polynesian descent. This study examined coping strategies, attitudes toward seeking mental health counseling, public and self-stigma toward seeking mental health services, and psychological adjustment among 638 Polynesian Americans. On average, participants held neither favorable nor unfavorable attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help, but men endorsed moderate self-stigma about mental illness and women endorsed high levels of public stigma about mental illness. Women showed relatively more favorable attitudes than men about seeking help from professional mental health providers. Participants reported benefitting more from culturally congruent practices for coping with distress (accepting, reframing, striving, family support, and religiosity/spirituality) than from seeking assistance from private emotional outlets (e.g., therapy) or avoidance and detachment. Mental health professionals need to build cross-cultural bridges and culturally adapt services to address concerns among Polynesian Americans.

Psychotherapy utilization and presenting concerns among Polynesian American college students (2016)

Authors: Allen, Gerald Kawika; Cox, Jon; Smith, Timothy B; Hafoka, Ofa; Griner, Derek; Beecher, Mark E

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Sage Publications

Volume: 44

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 28-49

Bringing spiritually oriented psychotherapies into the health care mainstream: A call for worldwide collaboration (2015)

Authors: Richards, P. ; Sanders, Peter; Lea, Troy; McBride, Jason; Allen, Gerald Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: American Psychological Association

City: Washington, DC

Country: United States

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 169-179

Editors: Lisa Miller and Len Sperry

Spiritual pathways to healing and recovery: An intensive single-N study of an eating disorder patient (2015)

Authors: Lea, Troy; Richards, P.; Sanders, Peter; McBride, Jason; Allen, Gerald Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: American Psychological Association

City: Washington, DC

Country: United States

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 871-887

Editors: Lisa Miller and Len Sperry

Spiritual Pathways to Healing and Recovery: An Intensive Single-N Study of an Eating Disorder Patient (2015)

Authors: Allen, G. E. Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: American Psychological Association

City: Washington, DC

Country: U.S.

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 191-201

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/scp0000085

Editors: Lisa Miller

Abstract: click to view

This article presents an in-depth single case study of 8 sessions of spiritually integrated psychotherapy with a 20-year-old woman recovering from an Eating Disorder. The inclusion and utility of session-to-session outcome data as well as systematic follow up data in conjunction with in-depth qualitative interviews are shown. Dr. H and client’s perspectives are highlighted over the course of treatment. Clinical areas of focus were extracted from the the qualitative interviews and the therapeutic process is described. Single-case study statistical analyses were conducted to highlight clinical gains and maintenance.

Bringing Spiritually Oriented Psychotherapies Into the Health Care Mainstream: A Call for Worldwide Collaboration (2015)

Authors: Allen, G. E. Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: American Psychological Association

City: Washington, DC

Country: U.S.

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 169-179

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/scp0000082

Abstract: click to view

The purpose of this article is to describe an overall strategy and specific plans for bringing spiritually oriented treatment approaches into the health care mainstream. We describe Bridges, a practice-research network created in 2012 that is devoted to helping practitioners, researchers, educators, and pastoral professionals collaboratively pursue this goal. We describe the achievements of Bridges thus far, which include a website for networking, an online psychotherapy research system, several completed studies, and grant funding for future collaborative research studies. We conclude with an invitation to health care professionals around the world to join with us in efforts to mainstream spirituality into clinical practice so that spiritual sources of change and healing are never again neglected in the health care professions.

Examining legalism, scrupulosity, family perfectionism, and psychological adjustment among LDS individuals (2015)

Authors: Allen, G. E. Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Routledge

City: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

Country: UK

Abstract: click to view

This study examined the relationships and interactions between legalism, scrupulosity, family perfectionism, guilt, and shame among 421 Latter-Day Saints (LDS or Mormons). The results showed that scrupulosity fully mediated the links between legalism and guilt, as well as legalism and shame. A moderated-mediation effect was found, in which family discrepancy (maladaptive perfectionism) intensified the scrupulosity–shame association in the mediation model of legalism and shame by scrupulosity. Family discrepancy was not a significant moderator for the mediation model of legalism and guilt by scrupulosity. Additional results are provided and implications of these findings are outlined.

Exploring Perceived Attitudes of Counseling between LDS Religious Leaders and Mental Health Therapists (2014)

Authors: Allen, G. E. Kawika

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 36

Abstract: click to view

Perceived attitudes between mental health therapists and local congregational LDS religious leaders regarding the value, function, and efficacy of mental health therapy were qualitatively examined. Qualitative data emerging from 4 LDS religious leaders (all male; 3 bishops and 1 stake president) and 7 mental health therapists (5 females, 2 males) were analyzed. Results showed differences in attitudes related to the collaboration process as well as the efficacy and process of counseling between local mental health therapists and LDS religious leaders in a specific Southwest region of the U.S. Additional results are reported. Implications are discussed related to these findings.