Title

Professor

Contact Information

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Office: 306-E MCKB
Department:
EDLF
0

Research Interests

I focus on the field-based use of quantitative and qualitative research, evaluation and analysis systems relating to educational programs and services.

My current efforts target exploration of the factors and indicators leading to improvement of educational settings impacting the quality, efficiency, effectiveness, and equality of educational opportunities for all individuals, families and communities, particularly those from traditionally disadvantaged conditions.

Awards

Fulbright-Nehru Scholar, Ambedkar University, Delhi, India

U.S. Fulbright Program (United States-India Educational Foundation)

2015

Fulbright Distinguished Research Chair, National College of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland

U.S. Fulbright Program

2006 - 2007

UNESCO/IIEP Council of Consultant Fellows

UNESCO/International Institute of Educational Planning

2006 - 2015

Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award

BYU McKay School of Education

1993 - 1994

Selected Publications

Fortifying leisure: Adolescent perspectives of family leisure in Uganda (2015)

Authors: McGovern, Rachel Adams; Taniguchi, Stacy T; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Widmer, Mark Alan; Mugimu, Christopher; Nsubuga, Yusef

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: SAGE

Country: USA

Volume: 30

Issue: 6

Page Numbers: 729-750

URL: jar.sagepub.com

Abstract: click to view

This study examined family leisure patterns and meanings of family leisure from the perspective of adolescents living in the Mukono District of Uganda. Sixty-eight secondary students were interviewed. Results indicate Ugandan adolescent definitions of leisure reflect leisure as free time and leisure as a means to an end. Students mentioned three primary family leisure outcomes (enjoyment/fun, personal development, and family development) that point toward a core theme. Fortifying describes the importance Ugandan youth place upon family leisure outcomes that strengthen the individual to overcome inevitable challenges they will face throughout their lives and enable them to succeed, especially through family socializing activities, such as discussion and storytelling.

Headteacher visibility and perceptions of headteacher trustworthiness: Perspectives of Ugandan secondary teachers (2015)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Boren, David McKay; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Springer Press

City: Dordrecht

Country: Netherlands

Volume: 14

Page Numbers: 87-106

Editors: J. Zajda

Headteacher visibility and teacher perceptions of headteacher trustworthiness: A comparison of the Ugandan context to existing theory (2013)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Boren, David; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Elsevier

City: Oxford

Country: UK

URL: dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2012.08.003

Abstract: click to view

Students perform better academically in schools with high levels of trust. Yet school leaders primarily responsible for building cultures of trust may not know how to effectively build trust. This research examines how visibility of Ugandan headteachers is related to teachers' perceptions of headteacher trustworthiness. Using grounded theory, we interviewed 28 Ugandan secondary school teachers in eight schools in Mukono District, Uganda. Findings indicate teachers' perceptions of headteacher relational trustworthiness were related to headteacher visibility, with perceptions of both relational and competence trustworthiness being moderated by teacher and headteacher personal characteristics. Findings are comparable to U.S. based research.

Technology and education: ICT in Ugandan secondary schools (2013)

Authors: Newby, Landon; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Springer

Volume: 18

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 515-530

URL: 10.1007/s10639-011-9180-x

Abstract: click to view

Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) could, if adopted and implemented appropriately, support learning and teaching in developing countries to provide young people with skills they need to participate effectively in the global economy. However, a significant digital divide still persists between developed and developing countries in terms of both physical resources and the capabilities of teachers to effectively utilize limited ICT resources. A very real challenge for schools is to acquire and effectively utilize ICT given the reality of an environment of scarce and limited resources. This study examines ICT infrastructure and use in 11 secondary schools in Mukono, Uganda using qualitative case study methods including an ICT infrastructure assessment, observations, and interviews. Stratified random sampling was used to identify 7 schools initially; 4 additional schools were also purposefully sampled based on their high levels of ICT. Findings indicate that despite limited resources, schools are investing heavily into ICT. Researchers found that teacher ICT usage at school could be grouped into three categories: administrative (86%), entertainment (45%) and pedagogical (45%). Administrators at some schools reported using ICT primarily to attract students and increase revenue. Implications of this study will assist school administrators to make informed decisions concerning further investment in ICT, efficient use of limited technology resources, and improvement of educational opportunities for students.

Trust and educational leadership: Comparing the development and role of trust between U.S. and Ugandan school administrators’ (2012)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Boren, David; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Book, Textbook

Publisher: SAGE

City: London

Country: UK

URL: http://www.uk.sagepub.com/books/Book239025#tabview=toc

Editors: Christine Wise, Pete Bradshaw, and Marion Cartwright

Two Contrasting Models for Mentoring as They Affect Retention of Beginning Teachers" (2012)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Chou, Po Nien (Felipe); Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Dr. Pamela Salazar

City: Sage Publishing

Volume: 96

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 243-277

URL: 10.1177/0192636512447132

Abstract: click to view

Research indicates that mentoring programs help increase the retention of beginning teachers. School administrators may be presented with competing mentoring models, with various sources and types of support, aimed at improving beginning teacher retention. This study collected both qualitative and quantitative data under the rubric of a comparative case study method to investigate mentoring models in the Asher and Dane School Districts (pseudonyms). Using this approach, the authors explored the two distinct models related to beginning teacher retention. Although both districts used collaborative teams, in-school mentors, and principals within the context of professional learning communities to participate in the mentoring of beginning teachers, only the Dane School District employed district “coaches.” Findings from this research suggest that these “coaches” were not as effective as in-school mentors or collaborative teams in increasing retention, possibly because of lack of proximity and personal relationship. Additional findings describe and explain mentoring characteristics and different sources of support that benefited the mentoring experience and subsequent retention of beginning teachers.

School mapping and Geographical Information Systems (2011)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: UNESCO/IIEP

City: Paris

Country: France

Page Numbers: 215-239

Editors: Bray, M., & Varghese, N.V.

So you want to be a headteacher?: Liabilities of newness, challenges and strategies of new headteachers in Uganda (2010)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Information Age Publishing

City: Charlotte, NC

Country: United States

Volume: 1

Page Numbers: 51-76

Editors: A. R. Shoho & B. R. Barnett & A. K. Tooms

Abstract: click to view

As new school leaders acclimatize to a new role, their liabilities of newness are easily exposed. As a result, they must be strategic in both their actions and decisions if they are to lead effectively. This research suggests that new headteachers who seek advice, communicate, build relationships, and strengthen the school’s image may be more effective at addressing the challenges of their liabilities of newness and their specific educational context. Ministries of education, universities and other providers of leadership preparation, as well as new headteachers themselves, may benefit from this research to improve their educational systems. These better informed and more contextually sensitive efforts will better enable both the academic performance and economic viability of schools, particularly in contexts such as Uganda.

Strategic “Co-opetition”: Headteacher networking in Uganda’s secondary schools (2010)

Authors: Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher; Nsubuga, Yusuf

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Harvard Education Press

City: Cambridge, MA

Country: USA

Page Numbers: 197-220

Editors: Alan J. Daly

Who ya' gonna call? Networks of rural school administrators (2010)

Authors: Hite, Julie; Reynolds, Bart; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 31

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 11-28

Abstract: click to view

When they need help or advice, who are rural school administrators going to call? Relationships among rural school administrators develop into networks that can affect the success of administrators and their schools. Understanding the structure and content of these networks provides insights into how resources, innovations, and communication flow both within and between rural district administrators. Based on network theory and analysis, this study examines the structure, content, and strategic implications of the administrative networks in six contiguous rural school districts. Network graphs are included, illustrating both individual district and the combined six-district rural administrator networks. While acquaintance ties and active work ties are evident both within and across districts, relationally embedded ties and greater cohesion of ties are more evident within districts than across districts. Analyses include consideration of administrative assignment, gender, and geographical location of the network structures. Strategic implications of the network structures and content are discussed.

UNESCO’s International Institute for Educational Planning (2010)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Bray, Mark

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Elsevier

City: Oxford

Country: UK

Volume: 4

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 688-693

Editors: P.L. Peterson, E. Baker, & B. McGaw

Capacity development in educational planning and management: Learning from successes and failures. (2009)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey; DeGrauwe, Anton

Publication Type: Monograph

The development and role of trust in educational leadership: A comparative study of U. S. and Ugandan school administrators (2009)

Authors: Hallam, Pamela Rust; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Emerald Publishing

City: Brighton

Country: UK

Volume: 11

Page Numbers: 49-81

Editors: A.W. Wiseman & S. Silova

Abstract: click to view

The development and role of trust in school performance has been built upon educational research in the United States. The problem is that the resulting theory of trust may not accurately reflect the development and role of trust in schools in other global contexts. Researchers broadly agree that the implications of trust dynamics filter into every aspect of the school?s organization. However, trust is often either oversimplified or made to seem overly complex, whereas reality is likely somewhere in the middle and depends largely on specific national and regional circumstances. The resulting problem for school administrators globally is a lack of role clarity regarding their leadership responsibilities related to trust and school performance. This chapter synthesizes two research studies to compare and contrast the role and development of trust in U.S. and Ugandan schools. The purpose of this chapter is to examine more contextualized notions of trust, taking into account the different environments of these schools, specifically in terms of accountability and goal tangibility. This chapter argues that while both the construct and facilitation of trust are indeed highly contextualized, a broader theoretical model grounded in leadership, network and organizational theories can provide insights about the role and development of trust to educational leaders in both U.S. and Ugandan schools.

The Online Journal of Distance Education reaches the 10-year mark: A look back using social network theory to examine its collaboration network (2008)

Authors: Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Howell, Scott; Crandall, Lenae

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 11

Issue: 3

URL: www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall113/hite113.html

Abstract: click to view

This article uses social network theory to analyze the collaboration network of authors and institutions who have contributed to the Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration during the past decade (1998?2007). The following three research questions guided this study: 1. What are the journal demographics: acceptance rates, authorship, institutional representation, and international presence? 2. What is the nature of the structure of the OJDLA co-author collaboration network? 3. What are the strategic implications of this collaboration network structure? This study of the helps elucidate the role of knowledge creation and diffusion in the field of distance learning from a social network perspective. While the 10-year-old OJDLA collaboration network presently reflects a strong peripheral structure with low cohesion, few bridging ties, and few brokering authors, it will evolve and mature in the years to come. Certain authors are already emerging as central in the network as determined by coauthoring across network components (bridging) and coauthoring with a greater number of other coauthors (brokering). The corresponding institutional network, an aggregate of the author network, also demonstrates a clear peripheral structure, though a core component is now present. Within this institutional core, more complex network structures are evident, including stronger ties, bridging, and brokering. The centrality of certain institutions is evident and may be influenced by the centrality of authors at the University of West Georgia, Texas A&M, and University of Nebraska?Lincoln. The case of the OJDLA collaboration network reflects three potential norms for publishing in the distance learning field: sole authoring (low author collaboration), the influence of certain U.S. higher education institutions within the network, and the emergence of strategic cross-institutional collaboration.

Sociocultural Aspects of Russian-Speaking Parents' Choice of Language of Instruction for Their Children in Estonia: Parental Choice and Language of Instruction Policies and Practices in Estonia (2008)

Authors: Kemppainen, Raija; Ferrin, Scott Ellis; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Hilton, Sterling Clint

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: University of Chicago Press, for CIES

City: Chicago

Volume: 52

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 93-119

Abstract: click to view

Was my doctoral student. A portion of dissertation.An investigation of the rationales and characteristics of "Russian" parents in choosing between Estonian, all Russian, or bilingual educational settings for their children. This is an important laboratory of the second language acquisition theories and rationales of parents because there is open choice in Estonia at this point. Findings include that the identification of self as Russian or Estonian "culturally" is very predictive and more complicated and nuanced by earlier "Russification" practices. Parental attitudes about group identification and target culture and parent culture and economic viability interact in novel ways and are synergistically more powerful predictors than socio-linguistic theory might have predicted or accounted for.

Organizational integration strategies for promoting enduring donor relations in higher education: The value of building inner circle network relationships (2007)

Authors: Chung-Hoon, Tanise Louise; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 7

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 2-19

Abstract: click to view

Successful fund raising efforts are critical for public higher education institutions as they seek to offset uncertainty in government funding. This study evaluated the enhancement of fundraising capacity through the maintenance of enduring donor relationships. Utilising the Donor/Organisation Integration Model (Chung-Hoon & Hite, 2004), the study examined interactions with top ten donors at 132 public higher education institutions in the United States. Findings indicate that the combination of relational embeddedness and formal structural interaction was related to enduring donor relationships and was also related to greater fund raising outcomes. The study proved useful in identifying inner circle donor behaviors and fund raising strategies contributing to enduring donor relationships.

Evaluating HIV/AIDS education programmes in Ugandan secondary schools. (2007)

Authors: Jacob, W. James; Mosman, Stacey; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Morisky, Donald; Nsubuga, Yusuf

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 114-123

Abstract: click to view

Although not part of the national curriculum until 2004, HIV/AIDS education has been taught for some time in Ugandan secondary schools through a variety of extracurricular means, including the media, youth groups, drama, music, and Parent?Teacher Associations. This article identifies and evaluates the integration of HIV/AIDS information into the national curriculum in Ugandan secondary schools between 2002 and 2004, based on the viewpoints of administrators, teachers, and students from 76 schools. While most schools did not include HIV/AIDS as part of the formal national curriculum at this time, the information was disseminated through a range of alternative means. The authors identify the most effective of these, discuss the perceived reactions of various stakeholders regarding HIV/AIDS being taught in secondary schools, and make recommendations for curricular reform.

HIV/AIDS education: What African youth say is effective (2007)

Authors: Jacob, W. James; Shaw, Stacey; Morisky, Donald; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Nsubuga, Yusuf

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 88

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 104-114

Abstract: click to view

This study on HIV/AIDS-education programs was conducted with the Uganda Ministry of Education and Sports in a national sample of 76 secondary schools in Uganda. Participants included secondary students (N = 883) who critiqued their formal and informal school curricula and offered youth perspectives regarding what teaching mediums and programs of HIV/AIDS prevention are most effective. Results indicated that HIV/AIDS education is not taught in their respective school curricula. Students report on informal ways that are helpful in learning about AIDS, recommend changes to their school?s curriculum, and report that reactions from various groups in their lives to HIV/AIDS education in their school would be positive. This study provides students, parents of students, educators, social workers, and policymakers with insights on how to better develop, update, and improve HIV/AIDS programs.

Building bridges for resource acquisition: Network relationships among headteachers in Ugandan private secondary schools (2006)

Authors: Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Jacob, W. James; Rew, William; Mugimu, Christopher

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 26

Issue: 5

Page Numbers: 495-512

Abstract: click to view

Schools in developing contexts, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, are often resource poor and seek to access resources from their external environments in order to improve school performance. Critical conduits for resource access are found among the school?s external network of relationships between school administrators. Using both network and qualitative methods in the field, this research explores and describes the external financial, physical, and human resource network relationships among secondary school headteachers in Mukono District, Uganda. The findings identify implications of resource network structure for resource acquisition and therefore improving school performance.

(Introduction) Youth and children overcoming AIDS: Lessons learned from Uganda (2006)

Authors: Morisky, Donald; Jacob, W. James; Nsubuga, Yusuf; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Information Age Publishing

City: Greenwich, CT

Page Numbers: 1-11

Editors: W.J. Jacob, D.E. Morisky, Y.K. Nsubuga, & S.J. Hite

Evaluation of HIV/AIDS education programmes in Uganda (2006)

Authors: Jacob, W. James; Morisky, Donald; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Nsubuga, Yusuf

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Information Age Publishing

City: Greenwich, CT

Page Numbers: 63-84

Editors: W.J. Jacob, D.E. Morisky, Y. K. Nsubuga, & S.J. Hite

Youth and children overcoming AIDS: Lessons learned from Uganda (2006)

Authors: Jacob, W. James; Morisky, Donald; Nsubuga, Yusuf; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Book, Scholarly

Publisher: Information Age Publishing

City: Greenwich, CT

Page Numbers: 315

Searching for enduring donor relationships: Evidence for strategies and factors in an integrated fund raising model (2005)

Authors: Chung-Hoon, Tanise Louise; Hite, Julie; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 6

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 34-53

Abstract: click to view

Higher education relies upon private philanthropy as a significant source of outside revenue, yet competition for donor resources escalates annually. Competency for building enduring donor relationships may positively influence institutional fundraising outcomes by addressing this problem. Qualitative data are presented examining the utility of the Donor/Organization Integration Model (Chung-Hoon, J. Hite, & S. Hite, 2004) for identifying long-term donor linkage. In the context of three public institutions of higher education, relational embeddedness interaction and formal structural interaction were specifically identified as factors. Four distinct strategies were found to illustrate interaction between individual relationships and organizational structure to categorize donor integration levels.

Discerning trends, contours and boundaries in Comparative Education: A survey of comparativists and their literature (2004)

Authors: Cook, Brad; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Epstein, Erwin

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 48

Issue: 2

Page Numbers: 123-149

Helping the Street Children: An Analysis of the Model for Orphan Resettlement and Education (MORE) (2004)

Authors: Jacob, W. James; Smith, Troy; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Cheng, S

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 10

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 3-21

Improving resource acquisition for private schools in Uganda: The role and structure of strategic networks (2002)

Authors: Hite, Julie; Mugimu, Christopher; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Professional or Trade Magazine Article

Volume: 1

Page Numbers: 9-13

Abstract: click to view

With the growth of private schooling in Uganda, the critical question of how private schools can provide quality educational services with limited resources must be addressed. Private schools should explore the role and structure of strategic networks for resource maximization and acquisition. Private school administrators can work together, both in partnerships and within larger network systems, to improve resource acquisition and to create a positive environment for Uganda education. Foresighted private school administrators in Uganda can develop dynamic, beneficial network relationships and mobilize their colleagues to improve resource acquisition. Private schools are positioned to serve Ugandan students well, particularly if their efforts and resources are coordinated through formal and informal networking systems. Future educational research should continue to examine network structure and its strategic roles for resource acquisition within the context of private schools in Uganda.

Reviewing quantitative research to inform educational policy processes (2001)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Monograph

Publisher: UNESCO/IIEP

City: Paris

Country: France

Volume: 69

Page Numbers: 121

Lifelong learning in low development contexts: An African perspective (2001)

Authors: Atchoarena, David; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers

City: Dorcrecht

Country: The Netherlands

Volume: 1

Page Numbers: 201-228

Editors: D. Aspin, J. Chapman, M. Hatton, & Y. Sowano

Outcomes-based education and quality in South Africa: Cursory remarks about a possible relationship (2000)

Authors: Botha, R; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 29

Issue: 1&2

Page Numbers: 129-141

One-teacher schools in America (1998)

Authors: Muse, Ivan; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Randall, Earl Vance; Jensen, Alan

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 33

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 141-149

Cultural values and education in Western Samoa: Tensions between colonial influences and contemporary indigenous needs (1997)

Authors: Tavana, Gaugau; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Randall, Earl Vance

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 6

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 11-19

Higher education training deficiency in parent involvement subject matter (1995)

Authors: Young, James; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 26-28

Successful and unsuccessful candidates for public school administrative positions (1994)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Krueger, Joanne; Basom, Margaret

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 4

Issue: September

Page Numbers: 557-576

The status of teacher preservice preparation for parent involvement: A national study (1994)

Authors: Young, James; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 1

Issue: 115

Page Numbers: 153-158

Domain 7: Delegation (1993)

Authors: Muse, Ivan; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Smith, R; Matthews, L Joseph; Britsch, Catherine

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: National Policy Board for Educational Administration

City: Fairfax, VA

Page Numbers: 7-1 - 7-24

Editors: S.D. Thompson

Selecting students for leadership preparation (1992)

Authors: Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Page Numbers: 1-5

Evaluation: Who’s doing it and how? A report from a national program survey conducted by the Harvard Family Research Project (1986)

Authors: Weiss, Heather; Hite, Steven Jeffrey

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 3

Page Numbers: 4-7

Effects of preschool on educationally advantaged children: First phases of a longitudinal study (1983)

Authors: Larsen, Jean; Hite, Steven Jeffrey; Hart, Craig H

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 7

Page Numbers: 345-352