My Favorite Elementary School Teacher

The Fun in Learning

"One of my favorite teachers was Dale Urry in the sixth grade. He let us do many fun things, such as making tiki heads, jewelry, etc. We worked hard and played hard together. I felt like our class was a family. Mr. Urry pushed us to learn things while making them fun. We had contests to practice our math facts. He arranged for us to go and help younger students in math. Perhaps the best thing about him was how open he was with us and treated us like adults. He gave us choices. We felt more mature just by being in his class." Lee Ann Brocious

Believe in Yourself

"My favorite teacher was Mr. Sundlie. We all loved our fifth grade teacher, who showed respect to everyone. He provided us with experiences and interactions that prepared us for further education and success in life. My teacher taught me to believe in myself. I gained confidence from my relationship with him in my own abilities and knowledge that helped fuel all success I experienced as a student and in life." Aaron Ichimura

Better Than a Movie

"My sixth-grade teacher, Ms. Prudhomme, was my favorite teacher and probably the biggest influence in my desire to become a teacher myself. She was seriously a real-life version of Ms. Frizzle from Magic School Bus. Everything she taught was exciting and fun, but we weren’t just playing games all day. When we read books aloud, we read them with a passion that made the experience more exciting than a movie. When we studied ancient civilizations, we became the citizens of our respective civilizations and created the world they would have lived in. Everything we did was based around projects, discussions, drama, and creativity rather than textbooks or teaching for a standardized test. We wanted to learn. She also included a broad spectrum of topics rather than just the basics, incorporating things like yoga, music, German, and Spanish." Robin Shaw

We Were Awakened to the World

"My favorite teacher was my third- and fourth-grade teacher, Mrs. Mildred Wesson, in Staffordville Elementary School in 1950 and '51. There were four classrooms in this country school in a little town in northeastern Connecticut, with two grades in each classroom, grades one through eight, and she was also the acting principal." Read more from Elizabeth (Liz) Sartori

Living With Autism

"Mrs. Prinslow was my kindergarten teacher. Three days into the school year, she called my mother. I knew how to read, write, and do math, and that was the basic curriculum. She asked my mother if I should move to first grade or if she could create a 'personal' curriculum for me. My mother chose the latter, and I have fond memories of singing and playing in kindergarten." Read more from David Peterson

She Loved Us

"My favorite teacher was Ms. Bessie Snow. Why? She loved all of us. She taught the first and second grades in Enterprise, Utah. She gave each one of us a penny at the end of the week when we earned a star for each day of that week, and yet she was living at the home of someone who would take her in, and she wasn’t making that much as a teacher. I remember one fellow who always needed to go to the bathroom. Why? He wanted to get out of class. He always had to be hunted down and returned to class. One day she wouldn’t let him go. Unfortunately that afternoon after school, I helped her clean the blackboards and mop up under the table where he sat. I remember learning to read and write and do arithmetic; but years later when I was out of school and walking down the street in a different city, this lady came running towards me, shouting my name with arms stretched out wanting a big bear hug. It was Ms. Snow. She LOVED us and remembered us." Ivin Holt

Made to Feel Special

"My first grade teacher, Mrs. Ferris, was one of my favorite teachers. I can’t recall a single lesson or what she taught me, but she went above and beyond to make me feel special. I loved her so much that I remember sitting and thinking of a way to remember her name for my entire life, because I wanted to grow up to be a teacher just like her." Karen Wideman