BYU's Educator Preparation Program Receives National Accreditation

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The Brigham Young University Educator Preparation Program has been awarded the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) accreditation by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, for a period of seven years, until 2022.

“This accreditation is an affirmation of the strong work that is being done across the university to prepare the next generation of educators,” said BYU Academic Vice President Brent W. Webb. “The faculty and staff in many colleges have created a top-notch teacher preparation experience in a number of different disciplines for our students, so they can go out and teach others.”

BYU operates one of the largest teacher preparation programs in the United States, graduating approximately 800 new teachers each year. Approximately 10 percent of BYU students are involved in teacher education. BYU’s teacher preparation programs have been continuously accredited on a national level since 1954.

“It’s critical for us to know that we are hiring qualified educators to work with our children,” said Nebo School District superintendent Rick Nielsen. “This accreditation gives validity and credibility to the quality of candidates we are hiring.”

The goal of the Educator Preparation Program, which was established in 2003, is to ensure that each individual who graduates from BYU with a teaching degree is competent, caring, and qualified to teach in schools.

The Educator Preparation Program includes all colleges and departments across BYU preparing teachers in early childhood education, elementary education, special education, and secondary education. Currently the Educator Preparation Program includes 27 majors and 23 minors, grouped into 20 program areas across seven colleges.

Educator Preparation Program administration and oversight are responsibilities of the University Council for Teacher Education, which is composed of the BYU associate academic vice president for undergraduate studies, the dean of the McKay School of Education, and an associate dean from each participating college.

“This accreditation signals the ongoing commitment of BYU to its programs of high-quality educator preparation,” said McKay School dean Mary Anne Prater. “We are proud of this accomplishment and will maintain high-quality preparation of educators as we move toward the future.”

The Educator Preparation Program provides courses covering educational practices and research, and also coordinates functional issues involving faculty, students, and programs. The BYU–Public School Partnership districts of Jordan, Alpine, Nebo, Provo City, and Wasatch County provide classrooms for Educator Preparation Program students to complete field experiences.

“We work extensively with the Educator Preparation Program, and we have a great working relationship,” Nielsen said. “I think it’s unique that through the partnership we work not only with the McKay School of Education but arts and sciences preparation colleges as well.”

Writer: Fran Djoukeng

Contact: Cindy Glad (801) 422-1922