Q. Where are you from?
A. I am from Bethesda, Maryland, but I have lived in Utah since 2006.

Q.  What and where have you studied?
A. 
I spent a year in France in high school, which led me to do my bachelor's of science at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. I went to graduate school at Loyola University Chicago and then completed my internship and two post-doctorates at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Q. Where have you previously worked? 
A. 
I've worked in ERs, inpatient units, community mental health, and private practice in Chicago, Boston, and Utah. In 2006, I first came to BYU to work as an assistant clinical faculty at CAPS. I left my position when my first son was born and continued as affiliate faculty at CPSE while teaching some adjunct classes on campus and continuing to do research and private practice. Most recently, I worked for a year at the EFT Clinic in Salt Lake City before helping to start an online therapy practice called Bridges Psychotherapy Solutions, LLC, whose mission is to help therapists learn how to work competently with religious and spiritual values in psychotherapy. While I still see a few clients at Bridges, I have stepped away from a leadership role there to take my current faculty position in BYU's Counseling Psychology Department. I have also been very involved over the years with AMCAP, the Association for Latter-day Saint Counselors and Psychotherapists, which helps to provide gospel-centered mental health training and networking for Latter-day Saint mental health providers.

Q. Why did you choose to work at BYU? 
A. As I was finishing my PhD, and while on my internship in Boston, I joined the Church (21 years ago). Almost immediately, BYU started appearing in my life through the Latter-day Saints I met. Since then, and even as a graduate student reading the writings of BYU professors, I felt connected to the mission and goals of the university. My research, teaching, and clinical interests align with what others are doing at BYU. I love the many colleagues and students I have worked with over the years and feel at home at BYU.

Q. What is your favorite thing about the McKay School? 
A. 
The great people and being around other educators who are inspired by education and the learning process grounded in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Q. Growing up, what teacher inspired you the most? How? 
A. 
There were so many. My favorite was one of my college professors who had been a Catholic priest. He taught psychology in a way that was consistent with a spiritual/religious foundation, and encouraged me to study ethics and clinical practice; he also encouraged me to start reading the New Testament, which changed the course of my life.

Q. What accomplishment are you most proud of? 
A. 
Creating a special issue of the AMCAP journal focused on emotion, psychology, and the gospel. The intersection of these areas, I believe, is important in healthy mental and spiritual well-being. 

Q. What do you regret not starting or doing when you were younger?
A. Reading more. I watch my seventh-grader read all the time and I did not find a love of reading until I was a young adult. There is so much I want to read and not enough time to even make a dent in what I want to cover. 

Q. What was the first career you dreamed of having as a kid? 
A. 
I am in it! 

Q. Where is your favorite place to go on vacation? 
A. Italy. My mom's family is from Italy two generations back, and I love the warmth of the people and the amazing food! 

Q. What movie quotes do you use on a regular basis? 
A.
 From a TV show based on The Lego Movie called Ninjago. Our second-grader finds the best lines to quote from it and I borrow them.