Mary Lou Fulton 'Celebrating Character' Awards
Read Time: 3 Minutes 

Rubric

Consider the following theme inspired by David O. McKay: It is well for educators everywhere when teaching the young to have in mind Character, Conduct, and Citizenship.

Write about a time during your McKay School experience when you saw the importance of McKay’s "Three C's," and how you will implement them into your own teaching style upon graduation.

Your essay will be judged on the following three points:

1. Reader engagement 40 points

2. Adherence to the theme 50 points

3. Grammar 10 points

Other resources that could help you better understand the theme:

The full quote by David O. McKay.

 

There is not time this morning even to mention further these various phases of the Church, each one of which will apply to the needs, to the education, to the peace of individuals. I should like to take, as an example, however, the principle already named. Considering this will illustrate also how even a teacher may himself become warped in his attitude toward what he might consider merely a dogma. You know there are occasionally men in the profession of teaching—as that is my profession I can speak plainly—who pride themselves on being iconoclasts; but unfortunately, when such teachers break their so-called images they supply nothing to replace them. They destroy ideals but offer no others, thus leaving the young boy in doubt and uncertainty. Such a one seems to me to be heaving anchor and starting out on the ocean of life before his course is even charted. It is well not only for church people but for educators everywhere when teaching the young to have in mind the three "C's" as well as the three "R's" mentioned so proverbially. By those three "C's" I mean character, conduct, citizenship. The teaching of religion in public schools is prohibited, but the teaching of character and citizenship is required.

 

This graphic describing the "Three C's:"

David O McKay

It is well for educators everywhere when teaching the young to have in mind the three “C’s” as well as the three “R’s” mentioned so proverbially. By these three “C’s” I mean character, conduct, citizenship. 
Character: Character is the aim of true education, and science, history, and literature are but means used to accomplish this desired end. An upright character is the result of continued effort and right thinking, the effect of long-cherished association with God-like thoughts.
Conduct: Always live in obedience to law—physical law, intellectual law, spiritual law. The law is, we live our lives most completely when we strive to make the world better and happier.
Citizenship: I believe that only through a truly educated citizenry can the ideals that inspired the Founding Fathers of our Nation be preserved and perpetuated. Next to being one in worshipping God, there is nothing in this world upon which the Church should be more united than in upholding and defending the Constitution of the United States. 
The teaching of religion in public schools is prohibited, but the teaching of character and citizenship is required.
In my opinion the highest, noblest purpose in all our education, from the grades to the university, is to teach citizenship and noble character. 

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Eligibility

This contest is open to all McKay School majors. Secondary education majors are not eligible since they are primarily pursuing majors outside the subject matter of the McKay School. However, we encourage secondary education majors to participate in as much of our other Homecoming celebrations as they would like.

Deadline

All entries must be received by Google Forms on or before 11:59 p.m. on September 24, 2022.

Judging

Judging will be blind and done by a panel of subject-matter experts. Your essay should not include your name or other identifying information. The judges reserve the right to withhold any award if no entry merits the ratings established. Judging begins once the contest deadline has passed and takes up to two weeks, depending on the number of submissions. We will notify both winners and non-winners of the results by email.

Prizes

Contest winners and finalists may be published in issues of McKay School Magazine and on our official website during the subsequent year. Prizes will be awarded as follows in the following amounts for both undergraduate and graduate winners respectively:

First Place: $1,000
Second Place: $750
Third Place: $500

Right of First Refusal

Entering this contest indicates that you agree to give BYU McKay School the right of first refusal to publish all or part of your essay. We do not accept work that has been published or is under consideration elsewhere, that has previously won any award from another contest, or that may be the property of another publisher. Entries that are defamatory, profane, vulgar, racist, or bigoted will be automatically disqualified from consideration.

Formatting

No Identifying Information

Neither the name of the author nor any other identifying information should appear in the essays themselves, including document headers and footers.

Word Limit and Style

500 word limit. Please use a plain font and do not include photographs or other graphics as part of your essay. You may indicate in the submission form that you have appropriate graphics to add to your entry if it is chosen for publication. Approximately one-inch margins and 1.5 line spacing. Chicago style is recommended.