Learning Edge 2018 - in development

Conference Information

Keynote Speaker

Brian Housand

At-Large Member, NAGC Board of Directors–East Carolina University

Brian Housand is an associate professor and coordinator of the Academically and Intellectually Gifted Program at East Carolina University. He earned a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut’s National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented with an emphasis in both gifted education and instructional technology. Brian currently serves on the NAGC Board of Directors as a Member-at-Large. He frequently presents and works as an educational consultant on the integration of technology and enrichment into the curriculum. Brian is currently researching ways in which technology can enhance the learning environment and is striving to define creative-productive giftedness in a digital age. His website is http://brianhousand.com, and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianhousand.

Additional information at https://www.nagc.org/bio/brian-housand

Featured Artist

Donald Davis

Donald Davis was born in a Southern Appalachian mountain world rich in stories. While he heard many traditional stories about Jack and other heroic characters, he was most attracted to the stories of his own family and places of origin.  Davis begin retelling the stories he heard and then adding his own new stories to them until he was repeatedly asked to "tell it again, on purpose." During his twenty-five year career as a United Methodist Minister, Davis began to use stories more and more.  He was also asked to begin performing at festivals and in other settings until he retired from the church to tell stories full time. The author of eighteen books and more than forty original recordings, Davis is the recipient of both the Circle of Excellence and the Lifetime Achievement Awards from the National Storytelling Network.

Conference Schedule

Thursday, March 21
7:00 a.m. Registration/Breakfast
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Keynote
10:00–11:00 a.m. Breakout Session I
11:10 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Breakout Session II
12:10–1:10 p.m. Lunch
1:10–2:00 p.m. Story Telling
2:15–3:15 p.m. Breakout Session III

Breakout Sessions

21st Century Skills


Connecting Skills and Dispositions to the Future: the 6Cs

Biography

During this session, the presenter will share the research based process, and resources created for student engagement with the 6Cs: Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, Creativity, Character, and Citizenship.  Student directed and teacher guided, these fully integrated resources align with the USBE core and provide differentiated pathways for success for all students.  Teacher and Student use videos will be shared as well as instruction and assessment resources. 
Dr. Amy Miner taught elementary school in Jordan School District before going on to receive her Masters degree in children’s literature at BYU and her PhD from Utah State University in curriculum and instruction.
For over 25 years, in Utah, New York, Texas, and Colorado Dr. Miner has provided professional development training, curriculum consulting, and conducted research on integrated instruction and deep learning for students.
Dr. Miner worked as an Assistant Professor in teacher education at Brigham Young University for seven years and as a research associate for BYU CITES. She is currently working as a Curriculum Director for Alpine School District and is responsible for professional development for elementary administrators and teachers, as well as facilitates the research and resource design of deep learning and the 6Cs.

Jobs of Tomorrow, Today!

Biography

We’ve all heard the notion that we are preparing our students for jobs that do not yet exist, and while we may not know what tomorrow holds, today’s technologies have opened up new pathways for success. Gifted students' characteristics make them uniquely suited to not only follow these paths but to create entirely new paths. Join us as we explore examples of new types of careers and new tools that make them possible. Together we will investigate the essential skills necessary for future success and how we might adjust our classrooms to better prepare students for the world of tomorrow.
Brian Housand is an associate professor and coordinator of the Academically and Intellectually Gifted Program at East Carolina University. He earned a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut’s National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented with an emphasis in both gifted education and instructional technology. Brian currently serves on the NAGC Board of Directors as a Member-at-Large. He frequently presents and works as an educational consultant on the integration of technology and enrichment into the curriculum.
Brian is currently researching ways in which technology can enhance the learning environment and is striving to define creative-productive giftedness in a digital age.
His website is http://brianhousand.com, and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianhousand.
Additional information at https://www.nagc.org/bio/brian-housand

Transform Teaching through Hyperdocs

Biography

A HyperDoc is a digital document that is a mind-shift in the blended learning classroom. HyperDocs, along with the use of 21st Century Skills, have the potential to transform the way you instruct using technology. They are designed to differentiate instruction so that students are able to work at various paces and explore content in a flexible way. Come and explore HyperDocs with us!
Charles Hanosek is a digital coach in Nebo School District. This is his 16th year in education. He has taught second through sixth grades as well as having been an instructional coach. He received his bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education and master’s degree in Educational Leadership from Brigham Young University.
He has endorsements in Mathematics, STEM, and Educational Technology. On the side, if he is not with his family you can catch him on the soccer field as a referee or in a classroom teaching all ages and levels of referees.

Transform Teaching through Hyperdocs

Biography

A HyperDoc is a digital document that is a mind-shift in the blended learning classroom. HyperDocs, along with the use of 21st Century Skills, have the potential to transform the way you instruct using technology. They are designed to differentiate instruction so that students are able to work at various paces and explore content in a flexible way. Come and explore HyperDocs with us!
Heather Nelson has a Bachelor's in Elementary Education and a Master's in Education with an emphasis in mathematics. She has endorsements in Educational Technology, English as a Second Language, and Elementary Mathematics. She taught 2nd and 3rd grade for 10 years and has spent the last year as a Digital Learning Coach for Nebo School District. She is passionate about integrating educational technology and teaching digital citizenship.

Transform Teaching through Hyperdocs

Biography

A HyperDoc is a digital document that is a mind-shift in the blended learning classroom. HyperDocs, along with the use of 21st Century Skills, have the potential to transform the way you instruct using technology. They are designed to differentiate instruction so that students are able to work at various paces and explore content in a flexible way. Come and explore HyperDocs with us!
Myles Peterson has a Bachelor’s in Special Education and Elementary Education. He has an Educational Technology Endorsement. He taught 6th-Grade for 11 years in Nebo School District and has spent the last year as an Elementary Digital Coach. Myles is passionate about integrating 21st-Century Skills in the classroom and developing a more student-centered learning environment.

For Busy Administrators Only: 30 Game-Changing Apps in Under an Hour

Biography

Administrators are busy. Technology can help! In this energetic and informative session, we explore thirty ways to improve your leadership, efficiency, and productivity as a school or district administrator. Technology should make your job easier; let's talk about how it can do just that.
A fierce and faithful proponent of the effective use of technology in schools, Dr. Darren E. Draper is a CoSN Certified Education Technology Leader who currently serves as the Director of Innovative Learning in the Alpine School District. As the largest school district in the state of Utah, Alpine District educates nearly 80,000 students. 
With over twenty years of experience in the field, Darren is a UASCD board member and regular presenter at ed-tech and academic conferences nationwide. Most recently, his presentations at the CoSN, ISTE, UCET, and other conferences have centered on technology and instructional coaching, equity and the importance of a purposeful digital pedagogy, and the academic application of online social networking.

Fighting Fake News! Tools and Tactics for Becoming a SUPER Critical Thinker in a Digital Age

Biography

In 2006, we first learned that even the brightest students were easily fooled by internet hoaxes like the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. While we tried to laugh this as the folly of misguided youth, a decade later we witnessed the rise of fake news and its impact on the “post-truth” world of 2016 overrun by an ever growing network of social media. To fight for truth, justice, and yes, even the American way, this session presents a collection of superhero themed critical thinking activities designed to empower you and your students conquer the evils of fake news.  
Brian Housand is an associate professor and coordinator of the Academically and Intellectually Gifted Program at East Carolina University. He earned a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut’s National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented with an emphasis in both gifted education and instructional technology. Brian currently serves on the NAGC Board of Directors as a Member-at-Large. He frequently presents and works as an educational consultant on the integration of technology and enrichment into the curriculum.
Brian is currently researching ways in which technology can enhance the learning environment and is striving to define creative-productive giftedness in a digital age.
His website is http://brianhousand.com, and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianhousand.
Additional information at https://www.nagc.org/bio/brian-housand

Career & Technical Education: It’s Not Just for those “Other” Kids

Biography

I’m sure that you don’t need me to tell you that today’s workforce is rapidly changing. Because of the changes in the workforce, the way we educate students must change as well. Career & Technical Education has adapted rapidly to meet those needs. Formerly, vocational education was for specific students and limited programs were offered. Students were trained with a specific occupational skillset in mind.
These were typically students who were not planning on post-secondary education, or who struggled academically. Today’s Career & Technical Education is for ALL students. High demand skills are integrated with academic courses that are relevant and rigorous. Students can take classes that lead them to post-secondary training and highly skilled, high income jobs. Are you looking for a way to answer the question, “What do we do with students who already know?” Give CTE a try! Come learn about how CTE pathways can provide multiple opportunities for your students.
Michelle Price is the Director of Career & Technical Education for Alpine School District. Michelle has been an advocate of CTE in public education as a Business & Marketing teacher for 10 years and as a middle school Assistant Principal for five years. Michelle has a Bachelor’s Degree in Secondary Education from Idaho State University and a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership and Administration from Brigham Young University. Her current professional research and focus is on building strong pathways of study in high school that allow students to transition easily to post-secondary education or highly paid, highly skilled jobs. She resides in Saratoga Springs with her two children. Her hobbies include reading, hiking, running traveling, skiing, and water sports.

Cross-Curricular Integration


Recognizing High Quality Instruction for GT Students

Biography

What does high quality instruction for gifted students look like in practice? How can administrators better recognize and encourage such instruction? This session will focus just these questions as we hear from multiple principals how they have tackled these questions in their schools for the benefit of all students.
Kate Ross is in her 22nd year as an educator. She began her career teaching 7th and 8th grade English at Mountain Ridge Junior High, worked as an trainer and integration specialist for the online writing program My Access, coached first year secondary teachers in Alpine School District, and currently is the principal of Lindon Elementary. 
Throughout all of her different roles in education, she is passionate about helping all those around her to reach new heights and to recognize their potential. She sees her primary role as a facilitator and is relentless in her support of teachers and students. She enjoys spending time with her two daughters and husband.

Reading to Serve: Giving Reading Purpose

Biography

The World Class Reader Model (WCRM) includes elements that have traditionally been part of broad-based reading instruction: Loving to Read, Learning to Read, and Reading to Learn. However, WCRM includes an additional element that gives greater purpose to reading and motivates students to apply all the reading skills they've learned in the other three elements. That additional element is Reading to Serve. Applying the principles of service learning to reading instruction, Reading to Serve addresses many standards of the English/Language Arts Core Curriculum in a integrated fashion that motivates students to read and improves their reading skills. Examples of Reading to Serve projects from the federally funded Utah Center for the Advancement of Reading Excellence will be shared.
I have been interested in teaching students to be confident, inspired learners since my undergraduate work in the 1970’s. I have spent my career teaching students, teachers and administrators about the need to provide appropriate curriculum for all students in the school setting. My expertise is in designing and implementing programs at the school, district, and state level to create high-level, engaging experiences that provide appropriate challenge for all students in the school.
As the Director of the Utah Center for the Advancement of Reading Excellence Grant, I have had the opportunity to work with teachers throughout the state over the past three years in helping them learn new strategies to meet the needs of their advanced and gifted readers. This and the work I have done in Cache District in helping develop their gifted and talented program has been the highlight of my career. I have two sons and now a grandson who are my life and my joy. My husband Andy has been my rock and my inspiration in my educational journey.

Reading to Serve: Giving Reading Purpose

Biography

The World Class Reader Model (WCRM) includes elements that have traditionally been part of broad-based reading instruction: Loving to Read, Learning to Read, and Reading to Learn. However, WCRM includes an additional element that gives greater purpose to reading and motivates students to apply all the reading skills they've learned in the other three elements. That additional element is Reading to Serve. Applying the principles of service learning to reading instruction, Reading to Serve addresses many standards of the English/Language Arts Core Curriculum in a integrated fashion that motivates students to read and improves their reading skills. Examples of Reading to Serve projects from the federally funded Utah Center for the Advancement of Reading Excellence will be shared.
Dr. Scott L. Hunsaker is an Associate Professor in the School of Teacher Education and Leadership and Director of Undergraduate Teacher Preparation at Utah State University.  While at USU he has received the Teacher of the Year, Undergraduate Research Mentor of the Year, and Carl and Bill Strong Human Service Awards from the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services.  An active leader in gifted education at the national and state levels, Dr. Hunsaker has served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children and as President of the Utah Association for Gifted Children and has been recognized with NAGC’s Early Leader Award and UAGC’s Jewel Bindrup Award.
He is author of articles published in Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Roeper Review, Teaching for High Potential, and Parenting for High Potential. With his colleague Rebeccca Odoardi, he has authored two grants awarded under the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Student Program of the U.S. Department of Education.

Integrating Core Curriculum Into Enrichment Programs

Biography

Teaching is a busy profession! There is always more to do than hours in the day. Teaching core curriculum in tandem with enrichment programs is a way to add higher-level thinking skills and expanded opportunities for growth and talent development in a doable fashion. This session will highlight how debate, STEM activities, and other enrichment programs can promote deep learning of the core curriculum.  
Rebecca Smith has worked in education for 24 years.  She has served as a general education teacher, a gifted magnet classroom teacher, a teacher specialist in new teacher mentoring and in literacy, and is now a content administrator in the curriculum department in Jordan School District.  She values the full spectrum of educational opportunities offered in public school systems.  

Social/Emotional Needs of the Gifted


Creating Supportive Classroom Environments

Biography

A review of successful techniques that can be used to meet the social-emotional needs of high ability students and preventing challenging behavior in the elementary classroom.
Helena Mueller works as an elementary assistant principal in Alpine School District. She is passionate about assisting children in becoming life long learners.  She successfully incorporated Genius Hour and Problem Based Learning with her students when she was in the classroom.
When she was a classroom teacher she taught kindergarten, third and fourth grade in Alpine School District. She advocates for gifted and high ability students and their learning experiences. 

Developing Student Creativity Through Design Thinking

Biography

In this session we will learn why it is important to develop creativity in our students, and how the process of design thinking, a strategy used by many businesses for developing creative solutions, can foster creativity and teamwork within student teams. We will practice design thinking ourselves and then discuss how to use this process within our curriculum units.
Dr. Rick West is an associate professor in the Instructional Psychology and Technology department, where he researches online social learning communities, open education, and group creativity. He is the co-founder of the Creativity, Innovation, and Design group at Brigham Young University (http://innovation.byu.edu) and the new interdisciplinary design thinking minor.
He has published over 100 research and professional articles, and teaches courses in creativity, instructional design, evaluation, and academic research/writing. 

Perfection is Messy!

Biography

Gifted and talented students are used to succeeding and excelling in most subjects, and they often feel pressure from parents, peers, and teachers to lead the way academically. This can lead to unrealistic expectations of never making mistakes and always getting top grades. However, obtaining academic perfection is unrealistic, and the expectation is often harmful academically and psychologically. This presentation will discuss ways in which educators can establish a “messy” culture in which students develop realistic expectations and become used to less than perfect scores. 
Steve Smith is the executive director of Advising, Career, and Counseling Services at BYU, where he has worked for the past 27 years. Steve received his bachelor’s degree in Special Education and his master’s degree in Counseling and Guidance from BYU.  He received his doctorate in Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology from the University of Minnesota.  Prior to coming to BYU, Steve worked in counseling centers at the University of Minnesota and University of Utah. 

Above Mastery

Biography

How do you identify above mastery for report cards?  This session will discuss the importance of pre-assessing students to identify those above mastery before the unit starts. Strategies will shared for teachers to extend learning within grade level content, ideas for Depth and Complexity, DOK matrices, Curriculum Compacting, and the idea of mastery plus one.
Shari Taylor is the Director of Gifted Services for Alpine School District. She has been an educator for the district for 24 years teaching all elementary levels in music and advanced 5th & 6th grade instruction for all subjects. In addition to teaching children, Shari teaches adults working on their Utah State Gifted and Talented Endorsement and teachers for identified advanced classes.
Shari is the past president of the Utah Association of Gifted Children. She loves her career as a life-long educator and learner.

Passion Projects and Genius Hour

Biography

Three years ago Lindon Elementary began a journey with their GT classes to create authentic learning experiences that allowed students to leverage technology skills to further an individual passion project. These passion projects also allowed students to use their knowledge from across the curriculum to research, problem solve, and create. Passion projects were facilitated during Genius Hour time each week. Currently, that opportunity is being expanded to all 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students at Lindon Elementary.
In addition, job embedded professional development is helping Lindon teachers to develop their capacity to facilitate such work every classroom!  This session will focus on our journey as a school to provide all students the opportunity to use their knowledge and skills to innovate, to support all teachers in facilitating those opportunities, and to create unprecedented partnerships that allow for something magical!
Kate Ross is in her 22nd year as an educator. She began her career teaching 7th and 8th grade English at Mountain Ridge Junior High, worked as an trainer and integration specialist for the online writing program My Access, coached first year secondary teachers in Alpine School District, and currently is the principal of Lindon Elementary. Throughout all of her different roles in education, she is passionate about helping all those around her to reach new heights and to recognize their potential. She sees her primary role as a facilitator and is relentless in her support of teachers and students. She enjoys spending time with her two daughters and husband.

Passion Projects and Genius Hour

Biography

Three years ago Lindon Elementary began a journey with their GT classes to create authentic learning experiences that allowed students to leverage technology skills to further an individual passion project. These passion projects also allowed students to use their knowledge from across the curriculum to research, problem solve, and create. Passion projects were facilitated during Genius Hour time each week. Currently, that opportunity is being expanded to all 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students at Lindon Elementary. In addition, job embedded professional development is helping Lindon teachers to develop their capacity to facilitate such work every classroom!  This session will focus on our journey as a school to provide all students the opportunity to use their knowledge and skills to innovate, to support all teachers in facilitating those opportunities, and to create unprecedented partnerships that allow for something magical!   
Angel Holmes has twelve years of experience teaching both for charter and district schools. She's held positions as a science specialist, a service learning director, a technology innovator. She has been honored by the state Attorney General for helping students find unique ways to serve their community. Organizations her students have helped include The Family Support Center, The Good Samaritan, and The Christmas Box House. Mrs. Holmes is known for her creative classroom environment, hands-on science projects, and ability to create a climate full of enthusiasm.
She was nominated for Life Changer of the Year, a national award set aside for those able to reach many people by taking the time to help individuals. Mrs. Holmes loves to go on adventures with her husband and 9-year-old son. Their recent excursions have included practicing their Cantonese while living above McDonald's in Hong Kong, perfecting their British accents and channeling their inner Harry Potter while living in London, and most recently savoring all manner of pastries and baguettes while living in Paris.  

Differentiation Strategies to Provide Real Learning For All Students

Biography

In a class that has a range of abilities (and which class doesn’t?), it is the most able, rather than the least able, who will learn less new material than any other group.” (Susan Winebrenner, Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom, 2001.)
Peggy Crandall was an educator and administrator in Alpine School District for 31 years and has now been retired for the past five. Over the course of her career, she taught students ranging from Kindergarten through 8th grade. Much of her work was with gifted students, including a 5th and 6th grade Accelerated Learning Lab for six years, and 7th and 8th grade Advanced English and History classes for the following six years.
She was the Coordinator of Gifted Services for Alpine School District for five years, and then concluded her career in education as a principal at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork for her final five years. She earned her Gifted and Talented Endorsement through BYU, and currently teaches the Curriculum and Effective Instruction course for the Endorsement Program offered through the BYU CITES Partnership.

Authentic Connections


Gifted Students in my Classroom?

Biography

Not all gifted students in the regular classroom will be identified, and even those who are may not always appear to be gifted. It is important to not be distracted by stereotypes of giftedness. No gifted individual is exactly the same, each having unique patterns and traits. However, there are many academic and social/emotional traits that gifted students often possess. Recognizing these general traits and understanding how they may reveal themselves in the classroom is an important step toward working effectively with this unique group of children.
Teri Mattson is the Executive Board Consultant for the Utah Association for Gifted Children. With an endorsement in gifted education and a passion for the field, she has spent the last 33 years advocating for gifted children. Although retired, she stays involved in the field because of her commitment to helping others understand and serve this unique group of learners. Teri has worked as a classroom teacher in both regular and gifted magnet classrooms, as a Gifted/Talented Teacher Specialist and Gifted/Talented District Consultant in Jordan School District, and as an elementary school principal in Canyons School District.

What to do When They Already Know It

Biography

This session will focus on empowering students in the learning process. The message and ideas span all grade levels and content areas.

Relationships in the classroom

Ideas and strategies will be shared for administrators and teachers from elementary to high school.
Mike Roberts has taught middle school English for nearly twenty years. In that time, he has received numerous awards for his outstanding teaching, including the 2014 Utah English Teacher of the Year. Mike's most recent book, Hacking Classroom Management - 10 Ideas to Help You Become the Type of Teacher They Make Movies About, identifies a variety of strategies that empower students in the learning process (thus eliminating numerous classroom disruptions). Additionally, he is the co-author of The New Science Teacher's Handbook: What You Didn't Learn From Student Teaching, and was a featured columnist in English Journal.
Mike also teaches college classes focused on classroom management and literacy in the content areas. He has served on many educational committees, and has been a featured speaker at dozens of state, regional, and national conferences.
When he's not teaching or presenting, Mike can usually be found running ultra-marathons in the mountains. And even after all these years, he's still not sure which takes more energy...a week with 8th graders or a 100 mile race.
You can follow Mike on Twitter @BaldRobert
You can email Mike at thebaldenglishteacher@gmail.com

Reaching High Levels of Learning through Arts Integration

Biography

If you have ever said, “I’m not an artist” or “I can’t do art” then this class is for you. In this hands-on class, participants will be taught basic drawing skills and they will use these skills to create a finished piece.  We will discuss how using these same basic skills at their schools and with their students can help all learners, especially higher-level learners, to be more engaged in their learning. This class is geared toward elementary school level, but the concepts taught can be used in any classroom.
Heidi is in her fifteenth year of teaching.  She has taught preschool, kindergarten, 1st grade, and currently teaches 3rd grade at Spanish Oaks Elementary.  Heidi has a M.Ed in Education, with endorsements in both technology and arts integration. She is passionate about teaching and believes every child can be successful when given the right opportunities.  She loves learning and trying new things. Heidi and her husband, Scott, are the parents of three children; she loves spending time with her family.

Everything You Need to Know to Optimize Secondary School Arts Programs

A panel of representatives from four of Utah’s professional arts education organizations– the Utah Dance Education Organization, Utah Advisory Council for Theatre Teachers, Utah Arts Education Association, and Utah Music Education Organization – will share their thoughts and experiences on how to optimize the impact of arts programs on school culture and student achievement in secondary schools.
The conversation, moderated by member of the BYU ARTS Partnership staff, will cover topics such as hiring, resources, scheduling, collaboration, gifted/AP programs and access. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions of specific panel members or propose discussion topics for the group. A binder of material and resources will also be provided to all attendees.

Providing Challenge and Growth in the Arts-Integrated Classroom

Biography

A classroom rich in arts experiences provides challenge for students to learn core content, bringing out students' natural curiosity and creativity needed for learning and transferring knowledge to new situations. We will share examples of research-based arts strategies used in our arts-integrated classrooms.
Jayme Gandara is a graduate of Brigham Young University and has taught fourth and fifth grades in the Provo School District. She has a strong belief in integrating the arts into her daily classroom settings. She uses process dramas to teach history, incorporates music into math lessons and teaches visual art techniques using printmaking, scientific drawings, sketching, cartooning, watercolors and oil pastels. 
Her students study the works of Van Gogh, Joan Miro and others. She is also a recipient of her school's Golden Apple Award.

Providing Challenge and Growth in the Arts-Integrated Classroom

Biography

A classroom rich in arts experiences provides challenge for students to learn core content, bringing out students' natural curiosity and creativity needed for learning and transferring knowledge to new situations. We will share examples of research-based arts strategies used in our arts-integrated classrooms.
Jennifer Heldenbrand teaches at Canyon Crest Elementary in Provo City School District. She and her students find joy in learning by using art, drama, dance, and music to create deep connections to core content and develop skills as active learners.
Jennifer has bachelor degrees in music education and elementary education, and a master of education. In 2016, she was the recipient of the Arts Integration in Elementary Education award from the Sorenson Legacy Foundation.