Title

Associate Professor

Contact Information

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Office: 150D MCKB
Department:
IPT
0

Teaching Interests

Learning Theory; Research Methods; Agency in Education

Research Interests

Agency in Education; Design Practices; Qualitative Research Methods

Awards

Member of Golden Key National Honor Society.

Member of Golden Key National Honor Society.

1994 - Present

Sigmund Koch Early Career Contribution to Theoretical

Division 24 of the American Psychological Association

2004

Runner-up for the American Psychological Association Division 24 Student Paper

National Competition

1995

Young Faculty Award

Brigham Young University Class of 1949

2007

American Psychological Association Division 24 Student Paper

National Competition

1997

Selected Publications

Embodied Cognition, Representationalism, and Mechanism: A Review and Analysis. (2014)

Authors: Spackman, Jonathan; Yanchar, Stephen C

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Blackwell

Learning as Embodied Familiarization (2013)

Authors: Yanchar, Stephen C; Spackman, Jonathan; Faulconer, James E

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: APA

Volume: 33

Issue: 4

Page Numbers: 216-232

Toward An Edifying View of Critical Thinking in Applied Psychology (2012)

Authors: Yanchar, Stephen C; Jackson, Aaron Paul; Hansen, Kristen; Hansen, Jamie

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: AMCAP

City: Salt lake City

Country: USA

Volume: 34

Page Numbers: 69-80

Agency and Learning: Some Implications for Educational Technology Theory and Research (2012)

Authors: Yanchar, Stephen C; Spackman, Jon

Publication Type: Journal Article, Professional or Trade Magazine Article

How Do Instructional Designers Evaluate? A Qualitative Study of Evaluation in Practice. (2011)

Authors: Williams, David Dwayne; South, Joseph; Yanchar, Stephen C; Wilson, Brent; Allen, Stephanie

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Struggling with Theory? A Qualitative investigation of conceptual tool use in instructional design (2010)

Authors: Yanchar, Stephen C; South, Joseph; Williams, David Dwayne; Allen, Stephanie; Wilson, Brent

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 58

Issue: 1

Page Numbers: 39-60

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/911j85m78760k843/

The Use of Randomization in Educational Research and Evaluation: A critical analysis of underlying assumptions. (2008)

Authors: Davies, Randall Spencer; Williams, David Dwayne; Yanchar, Stephen C

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

City: London

Volume: 21

Issue: 4

Page Numbers: 303 - 317

Abstract: click to view

This paper considers the underlying assumptions related to the use of random assignment in educational research and evaluation; more specifically, the ability of random assignment to create similar comparison groups for the purpose of determining the effectiveness of educational programs. In theory, randomly assigning individuals to comparison groups is considered to be the best method available to maximize the likelihood that groups used in this type of research will be similar; however, in educational research designed to identify proven best practices, random assignment of individuals is rarely possible; other methods including random assignment of intact units and non-random selection techniques are often used. Using a database simulation, this study set out to determine the degree to which various selection methods might be effective at creating comparable groups. Given the complex dynamics of the teaching and learning process and the abundance of potentially confounding variables, it seems likely that comparison groups will always be dissimilar to some degree. While random assignment of individuals performed as expected when controlling for a single extraneous factor, the likelihood that comparison groups created in this manner will differ on one or more potentially confounding variables is extremely likely. Based on the results of this study, random assignment of intact units is not an acceptable alternative to random assignment of individuals. In fact, when using intact units, non-random selection techniques were considerably more effective at controlling for potentially confounding influences than randomly assigning existing classrooms to treatment and control groups.

Learning from programmed instruction: Examining implications for modern instructional technology (2005)

Authors: McDonald, Jason K; Yanchar, Stephen C; Osguthorpe, Russell T

Publication Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal

Volume: 53

Issue: 2

Page Numbers: 84-98

Thinking Critically About Critical Thinking (2005)

Authors: Slife, Brent; Yanchar, Stephen C; Reber, Jeffrey S

Publication Type: Book, Chapter/ Section in Scholarly Book

Publisher: APA Press

City: Washington, DC