Crunch and Make a Bunch of Punches!

Objective

Read and write words ending in the -ch digraph.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • punch
  • bunch
  • munch
  • crunch
  • hunch
  • lunch

Materials:

  • Hole punch
  • Hole punches made with the hole punch
  • Cardstock and scraps of paper
  • Celery, pretzel, and chip graphics (see below)
  • Yarn or string
  • Apples (or other crunchy food) (optional)
  • Lunch items graphics (see below)
  • Word blending cards (see below)
  • I Have a Hunch target text (see below)

State and model the objective

Tell the children they will make bunches of things that go crunch and read and write words ending in -ch.

Practice the skill within an activity

Hole punch and crunch a bunch

  • Write the words hunch, punch, and crunch on the board, point out the -ch at the end of each word and explain that and together make the /ch/ sound. 
  • Tell the children that the word ‘hunch’ means to make a guess, then tell the children that you have a hunch that a hole punch will make a crunch sound.
  • Demonstrate how to punch holes in cardstock and make a crunch sound.
  • Tell the children you also have a hunch that they could make a bunch of hole punches.
  • Let the children take turns hole punching and making the crunch sound until they’ve made a bunch of punches.
  • Tell the children you have a hunch that you could scrunch up all the holes they made with the hole punch.
  • Dump out or collect the hole punched circles on a piece of paper, pointing out that there are a bunch, then scrunch them up inside the paper.
  • Let the children punch holes then scrunch them up in scraps of paper.

Crunch and munch at lunch

  • Show the children pictures of food items that go crunch (i.e. a bunch of celery, a bunch of pretzels, etc.).
  • Have the children punch a hole in the celery, pretzel, and chip graphics (see below) because they all go crunch when you eat them.
  • Put a string through the hole on each graphic then bunch and scrunch together the food that goes crunch.
  • Tell children that they cannot munch on the paper food or the paper hole punches, but that you have a slice of apple (or another crunchy food) that they can munch (optional).
  • Pass out apple slices and tell children to listen for the crunch when they munch on their apple slice.
  • Make a list of other foods they could munch and crunch during lunch, showing them the lunch item graphics (see below) if they need ideas.

Apply the skill

Read target words in a text

  • Read the I Have a Hunch target text together with the children.
  • Read the text again fading support.
  • Have the children underline the words that end in -ch.
  • Make a list of the -ch words on a chart or on a board.

Write about the activity using target words/patterns

  • Give each child a paper and pencil and have them write -ch words from dictation: punch, munch, crunch, scrunch, bunch, hunch, lunch, brunch.
  • Have the children fill in incomplete sentences by picking from options presented verbally or in writing:
    • “I like to munch and crunch on…” (a bunch of carrots, a bunch of celery, a bunch of pretzels).
    • “I can make paper…” (bunch, scrunch, crunch).
    • “I have a hunch …” (the hole puncher will crunch, I will make a bunch of hole punches, the apple will go crunch, I can munch and crunch).

SEEL Target Texts

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I Have a Hunch

I have a hunch I can make paper crunch.
If I hole punch a paper, I can make it go crunch.
I have a hunch I can make a bunch of hole punches.
If I punch and punch paper I can punch a whole bunch.
I have a hunch I can scrunch up the holes.
If I bunch up the punched holes I can scrunch them all up.
I have a hunch I can munch and crunch.
If I munch on an apple I can make it go crunch.
I have a hunch I cannot munch on a paper lunch.
If I hole punch a paper lunch I cannot munch a paper punch.
I have a hunch I can make a bunch of foods that go crunch.
If I hole punch some paper celery I can scrunch up a bunch.

Printouts

Standards

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1. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.A: Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.
2. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.B: Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/