The King Who Swings

Objective

Read and write words ending in the -ng digraph.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • king
  • swing
  • ring
  • string
  • swung
  • bang
  • sing
  • sang

Materials:

  • Sting or yarn (cut in 1 to 2 foot lengths) - 1 for each child
  • King graphic (see below) - 1 for each child
  • Crown graphic (see below) - 1 for each child (optional)
  • Ring graphic (see below) - 1 for each child (optional)
  • A King on a String target text

State and model the objective

Tell the children that they will meet a king as they read and write words ending in -ng, such as string, swing, ring, and fling.

 

Practice the skill with an activity

  • King on a String
    • Write the words king, 
    • Read the A King on a String text to the class with the corresponding actions.
    • Give each child his or her own king graphic and string, have the children cut out the king graphic and attach the string to the back.
    • Read through the A King on a String text again as the children follow along with the corresponding actions.
    • Ask the children, “What else can we do with the king?” Together, think of action words that end with –ng and perform them on the king (e.g., fling, bang, spring).

Apply the skill

  • Read target words/patterns introduced in the activity
    • Write the sentence, “I am a king and I like ___.” Display the sentence for the children to see.
    • Read the sentence out loud together.
    • As a class, brainstorm to create a list of words that end with –ng to complete the statement. Write the words for the children to see.
    • Read the list of –ng words out loud together.
    • Read the sentence several times out loud with the childnre. Each time, insert a different –ng word into the space at the end of the sentence.
  • Write about the activity using target words/patterns
    • Instruct the children to turn the king graphic over and write the sentence, “A ___ for the king,” inserting an –ng word of their choice in the blank.
    • Optional:
      • Tell the children that it's their turn now to be the king with a ring.
      • Give each child a paper crown graphic and ring graphic. Instruct the children to cut them out.
      • Have the children write one of the –ng words on the paper ring.
      • Instruct the children to write their name on the crown after the word king. Then have the children turn the crown over and write five –ng action words they would do as a king.
      • Help each child tape the paper ring so it fits around his or her finger and the crown so it fits around the child’s head.
      • When all the children are wearing their rings and crowns, have them lift up the ring finger altogether and say, “I am a king and I like ___ (inserting the –ng word written on their individual paper rings).”
      • Allow the children to be kings who swing. Go to a playground with swings and take turns swinging while wearing the king crown and ring. Encourage the children to use words that end with –ng.

 

SEEL Target Texts

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A King on a String

This is a king.
This is a king with a ring.
This is a king with a ring on a string.
This is a king with a ring on a string
who likes to swing.
This is a king with a ring on a string
who likes to swing and sing.
Wow! What a king!

Printouts

Standards

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1. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.A: Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.
2. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.B: Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/