A Stick to Lick

Objective

Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ick  to make new words such as lick, pick, and stick.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • stick
  • lick
  • pick
  • quick

Materials:

  • Ice cream, popsicle, and lollipop graphics (see graphics below) -- taped or glued to a stick
  • -ick popsicle graphic and letter cards (see graphics below)
  • Popsicle sticks or craft sticks
  • Stick of candy, pretzel stick, carrot stick (optional)
  • A Stick to Lick target text (see below) 
  • Make a Stick You Can Lick target text (see below)
  • I Can Lick a Pretend Stick target text (see below)

State and model the objective 
Tell the children that they will pretend to lick treats on a stick while they add sounds to the -ick ending to make words such as lick, pick, and stick. 

Practice the skill within an activity

Pretend to lick things on a stick

  • Explain that sometimes people get to lick a treat on a stick.
  • Read the target text A Stick to Lick to the children.
  • Have the children underline the -ick ending in words throughout the text.
  • Point out that words spelled with the letters -ck have the /k/ sound. 
  • Show the children the paper ice cream, popsicle and lollipop attached to a stick.
  • Let the children pick the ice cream, popsicle, or lollipop and let them pretend to lick it.
  • Pretend the ice cream or popsicle melts and say, "Quick! Lick!"

Lick a food stick (stick of candy, pretzel stick, carrot stick) (optional)

  • Lick a small piece of a real stick of candy such as a stick of licorice.
  • Lick the salt off of a pretzel stick.
  • Lick ranch or some other dip off of a carrot stick. 

Make words that end in -ick on a stick 

  • Give the children a popsicle graphic (see below) with the -ick ending printed on the graphic.
  • Let the children choose a letter card (see below) to tape or glue on the blank line before the -ick ending.
  • Have the children blend the beginning sound with the -ick ending to read the word.
  • Have the children glue or tape a stick (a popsicle stick or craft stick) to the graphic.
  • Let the children pretend to lick the popsicle on the stick.

Apply the skill (choose from the following) 

Read target words in a text (see below)

  • Read the target text I Can Lick a Pretend Stick together as a class/group. 
  • Have the children help you make a list of all of the -ick words in the text. 
  • Emphasize the process of blending beginning sounds with the -ick ending to spell each word (e.g., /p/ + /ick/ = pick).
  • Repeat with the target text Make a Stick You Can Lick.

Write target words

  • Give each child a whiteboard and have them write words from dictation, changing one or two letters each time to make a new word
    • stick → tick → tock → tuck → suck → sick → pick → kick → kit → lit → lick → lock.
  • Emphasize the process of segmenting the sounds in each new word to determine which sound changed then blending the new sounds to make sure that the correct word is written.

SEEL Target Texts

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I Can Lick a Pretend Stick

I have a pretend stick.
I can lick my pretend stick. 
It can be an ice cream stick. 
It can be a popsicle stick.
It can be a lollipop stick.
It is a stick to lick!
Yum!  Yum!

Make a Stick You Can Lick

Make a stick you can lick.
Pick a stick. Pick a stick.
Stick a popsicle on the stick. 
Now we have a stick to lick. 
Quick!  
The popsicle is melting.
Lick the popsicle on your stick.  
Lick. Lick. 
We got a stick to lick.

A Stick to Lick

Here are things with sticks you can lick:
A stick of candy, a stick of gum,
A pretzel stick, a carrot stick,
And some ice cream on a stick.
 
Pick a stick to lick.
What did you pick?
Did you pick a candy stick to lick?
Did you pick a pretzel stick, a carrot stick?
Did you pick ice cream on a stick to lick?
 
Ice cream on a stick can drip.
Did you lick up the drips from ice cream on a stick.  
If you picked ice cream, did you lick up the drips?
If ice cream drips, just lick and lick!

Printouts

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.D: Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.C: Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/