The Dot

Objective

Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with –ot words to make words such as hot, dot, and spot.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • dot
  • hot
  • not
  • spot

Materials:

  • Large piece of paper
  • Various colors of paint and 1 paintbrush for each color (or markers/crayons)
  • The Dot target text (see below) (optional)
  • Who Has Got the Dot? target text (see below) (optional) 
  • The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds (optional)

State and model the objective 
Tell the children that they will play with colors while they add sounds to the –ot ending to make words such as dot, hot, not, and spot

Practice the skill within an activity

Hot or Not Dot

  • Read The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds (optional).
  • Before the activity, set the large piece of paper at the front of the room where everyone can see it. Place the paint and paintbrushes near the paper.
  • Explain to the children that the colors red, orange, and yellow are called “hot” colors, and that green, blue, and purple are called “cool” colors—they are not hot.
  • Have a child come to the front, choose a color of paint, and paint a single dot on the paper.
  • Ask the children, “Is (color chosen) hot or not hot?”
  • Have everybody shout out together, “Hot!” if the color is red, orange, or yellow or “Not hot!” if the color is green, blue, or purple.
  • Repeat until all children have had a turn drawing a dot on the large piece of paper.
  • Look at the class dot picture together, and decide if the overall image is hot or not hot.
  • Discuss what the piece of art looks like or could represent.

Guess the dot’s color

  • Read The Dot target text (see below) to the class.
  • Follow the directions of the text to create new colors.
  • Fill in the blanks when the children find out what color are being created.

Apply the skill (choose from the following)

Read target words in a text (see below)

  • Display the target text The Dot and read it again, this time together as a group. 
  • Read the text again fading support.
  • Have the children underline the words that end in –ot.
  • Repeat with the target text Who Has Got the Dot? (optional).

SEEL Target Texts

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The Dot

Find the red pot.
Find a spot for a red dot.
Find the blue pot.
Paint a blue dot on top of the red dot.
Now what color dot have you got? 
“I’ve got a ___ dot.” 
Rinse your brush in the water pot.
Find the yellow pot.
Find a spot for a yellow dot.
Find the blue pot.
Paint a blue dot on top of the yellow dot.
Now what color dot have you got?
“I’ve got a ___ dot.” 
Rinse your brush in the water pot.
Find the red pot.
Find a spot to paint a red dot.
Find the yellow pot.
Paint a yellow dot on top of the red dot.
Now what color dot have you got?
“I’ve got a ___ dot.” 
Rinse your brush in the water pot.
Now find a spot to sign your dot paper!

Who Has Got the Dot?

Dot, dot, who has the dot?
Spot, spot, where is the spot?
Do you have the dot?
No, you do not.
Do you have the spot?
No, you do not.
Dot, spot, where is the dot?
Spot, dot, who has the spot?
You have a spot! 
I see the dot!
Now I get your spot,
and you find the dot!

SEEL At Home

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Print

Objective
Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with –ot words to make words such as hot, dot, and spot.
 

Materials

  • 2 pieces of paper
  • red, yellow, orange, blue, green, and purple markers or crayons

Activity: The Dot 

  • Have your child tell you what he or she learned about the colors of the rainbow. Review that red, yellow, and orange are hot colors, and blue, green, and purple are cool colors, which are not hot.
  • Have your child choose a color and make a single dot on a piece of paper.
  • Ask, "Is (color chosen) hot or not hot?" Have him or her respond "Hot!" if the color is red, orange, or yellow or "Not hot!" if the color is green, blue, or purple.
  • Take turns drawing dots and responding to the question.
  • Look at the dot picture together, and decide if the overall picture is hot or not hot.  
  • Have your child draw a large dot outline on the other piece of paper. Help him or her write all the -ot words he or she can think of inside the dot.  
  • Send the dot to school with your child to share with a teacher and a friend.
  • The activity can be repeated several times.

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.D: Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.C: Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/