make a cap

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Target text

Objective

Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ap to make and read words such as cap, flap, snap, and strap.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • cap
  • nap
  • snap
  • flap
  • wrap
  • strap

Materials:

  • Scraps of paper and cloth
  • Cap pattern graphic* 
  • Word-blending cards* 
  • Where is My Cap? target text* 
  • Let's Wrap a Cap! target text* 
  • Book: Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina (1940) (optional)

*Items included below. 

State and Model the Objective 
Tell the children that they will wrap caps as they add sounds to the -ap ending to make and read words, such as cap, snap, flap, scrap, and wrap

Literacy Activities
Make caps

  • Read the story Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina (optional).
  • Give the children the scraps of paper or the cap pattern and have them label cap, strap, snap, and flap.
  • Make a cap with the scraps of paper or the cap pattern:
    • Cut a slit to the center of a round piece of paper. 
    • Make a shallow cap by overlapping the parts of the round paper. 
    • Use a stapler to ‘snap’ or secure the overlapping flap on the cap.
    • Snap (staple) on flaps, straps, and paper snaps while making comments such as “snap a flap on the cap,” and “snap on a flap, snap a strap on the flap, and snap a snap on the strap.”

Wrap a cap and take a nap

  • Let the children wrap the caps in scraps of paper.
  • Have the children put the cap in their laps and pretend to take a nap.

Make -ap words

  • Have the children pass a paper cap.
  • Have children say a word that ends in -ap and write the -ap word on the cap.

Identify, blend, and manipulate sounds

  • With word blending cards, have the children make new words by changing the vowel or either of the consonants:
    • Change the beginning sound(s): captap; lapnap; snapflap
    • Change the vowel: flapflip; snapsnip; capcop
    • Change the ending sound: capcat; raprag; taptan

Read target words in a text

  • Read the Where Is My Cap? target text together as a group. 
  • Have the children find the words that end in -ap.
  • Repeat with the Let's Wrap a Cap! target text.

Write about the activity using target words

  • Have the children write words from dictation: nap, snap, lap, cap, nap, rap, and tap.
  • Write words and have children change one or two letters to make a new word: sapnap; napsnap; snapsnip; sniplip; liplap; lapcap; capcat; catrat; ratrap; raptap.

SEEL Target Texts

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Let's Wrap a Cap

Let's wrap a cap!
Get a scrap of paper.
Put the paper in your lap.
Put the cap on the scrap of paper.
Flap the paper over the cap.
Make another flap.
It's a snap!
Put the wrapped cap in your lap.
It's a snap to wrap a cap!

Where Is My Cap

Where is my cap?
Have you seen my cap?
My cap has a strap.
Where is my cap with a strap?
My cap has flaps.
Have you seen my cap with flaps and a strap?
My cap has snaps.
Where is my cap with snaps, flaps, and a strap?
I see my cap!
I love my cap with snaps, flaps, and a strap.

Printouts

SEEL At Home

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Print

Objective 
Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ap to make and read words, such as cap, flap, snap, and strap.

Materials

  • Cap pattern graphic
  • Scraps of fabric or paper
  • Scissors

Activity: Make a Cap

  • Help your child make a cap with flaps, straps, and paper snaps out of scrap fabric or paper:
    • Cut a slit to the center of a round piece of paper. 
    • Flap over the parts of the round paper to make a shallow cap. 
    • Use a stapler to ‘snap’ the cap’s flap.
    • Snap (staple) on flaps, straps, and paper snaps.
  • Say phrases with the -ap words as you work together (e.g., “Snap a flap to the cap”).
  • Take turns wearing the cap.  
  • Blend sounds in -ap words (e.g., c + ap = cap; n + ap = nap). 
  • Break up -ap words into their sounds (e.g., lap = l + a + p; nap = n + ap).
  • Count the sounds heard in -ap words by holding up a finger for each sound (e.g., c - a - p -- three fingers!).

 

Standards

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 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.D: Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.C: Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/