snag and wag a flag

Objective

Read, write, and experiment with words that end in
-ag.
 

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • wag
  • rag
  • tag
  • bag
  • drag

Materials:

  • Scraps of fabric
  • Straws or sticks
  • Bag 
  • Tag graphics*
  • Real flag (optional)
  • Word-building cards*
  • Wag a Flag target text*

*Items included below. 

Overview
The children will turn rags and tags into flags and then read and write words ending in -ag, such as rag, bag, tag, wag, and drag.

Literacy Activities
Make flags with rags and tags

  • Help the children attach a scrap of fabric, called a rag, to a straw or stick and label the flag Rag flag with a permanent marker.
  • Invite the children to wag their rag like a flag.
  • Repeat with a tag graphic and label the new flag Tag flag.
  • Have the children place all the rag flags and the tag flags in a bag.
  • Tell the children to snag a flag out of the bag and wag the flag.
  • Have the children say, “I can wag a rag flag” or “I can wag a tag flag.”

Pass the Flag game (similar to the game Hot Potato)

  • Have the children take turns passing a half-sheet of paper attached to a stick as a flag while music plays.
  • As each child gets the flag, have him or her say a new word that ends in -ag (support as needed).
  • Write each new word on the board.  
  • When everyone has had a turn, have the children read all of the -ag words.
  • Repeat the game, but this time, have the children write their word in small print on the flag graphic when the flag stops at them.

More Practice

Read target words in target texts 

Read the Wag a Flag target text (see below) together with the children. 
Read the text again, fading support, and adding the actions.
Have the children underline the words that end in -ag.

Identify, blend, and manipulate sounds

  • With word-building cards, have the children make new words by changing the vowel or either of the consonants:
    • Change the beginning consonant(s): ragdrag; tagsag; baglag; wagnag
    • Change the ending consonant: ragranrat; tagtaptan; bagbatbad
    • Change the vowel: tagtug; ragrugrig; laglogleg; bagbigbugbeg 

Write about the activity using target words and patterns

  • Give the children whiteboards and have them write words from dictation, changing one or two letters each time to make a new word (e.g., tag, tug, bug, big, bag, bat, bit, sit, sat, sag).
  • Have the children help create a word wall with -ag words from the lesson.
  • Engage the children in interactive writing about their experience by letting them use the word wall to fill in the blanks in these sentences (support as needed).
    • I can make a_____ (rag) _____ (flag).
    • I can make a  _____ (tag) _____ (flag).
    • I can _____ (snag) a _____ (flag) from a _____ (bag).
    • I can _____ (snag) and _____ (wag) a _____ (flag).

SEEL Target Texts

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Wag a Flag

Do as I’m doing.
Wag and wag a flag. 
Do as I’m doing.
Wag and wag a flag.
Wag and wag it high or low.
Wag and wag it fast or slow.
Do as I’m doing.
Wag and wag a flag.

Printouts

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Print

Objective
Read and write words that end with -ag.

Materials

  • Rag (a scrap of fabric or a tissue)
  • Straws or sticks 
  • Piece of colored paper
  • Tag graphic*
  • Wag a Flag target text*

*Items are included below. 

Activity: Wag and Drag a Rag

  • Help your child read the Wag a Flag target text aloud.
  • Attach a quarter-sheet of paper to a straw or a stick to make a flag, then invite your child to act out the text using the flag.
  • Repeat the activity with different -ag objects, wagging a tag and then a rag,  changing the text to match (i.e., “Do as I’m doing. Wag and wag a tag.”).
  • Read the Wag a Flag target text again and have your child find and underline the words ending in -ag.
  • Write a list of -ag words with your child and read them aloud together as your child waves the flag.

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.B: Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.D: Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words. (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/