Make a Cap

Objective

Read and write words that end in -ap.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • cap
  • wrap
  • scrap
  • flap
  • snap
  • strap

Materials:

  • Cap pattern
  • Scraps of paper and cloth
  • Small pieces of paper
  • Word cards
  • Make a Cap target text
  • Let’s Wrap a Cap target text
  • Book: Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina (Harper Collins, 1987) (optional)

Overview
The children will wrap caps and read and write words ending with -ap, such as cap, snap, flap, scrap, and tap.

Literacy Activities
Make caps

  • Show the children the cap pattern and demonstrate how to make a cap using a scrap of paper (or fabric):
    • OPTION 1: Cut out the parts of the cap pattern.
      • Overlap and staple the two sides of the slit together to form the cap, repeating the word “snap” each time you use the stapler.
      • Attach the straps and snaps to the cap with the stapler.
    • OPTION 2: Cut out circles from scraps of paper or cloth and cut a slit to the center.
      • Snap (staple) the two sides of the slit to form the cap.
      • Make straps and flaps out of scraps of paper or cloth to snap onto the caps.
  • Have the children write -ap words (e.g., flap, strap, snap, cap) on small pieces of paper and attach the words to the cap.

Wrap a cap and wrap -ap words

  • Let the children wrap the caps in scraps of paper or cloth.
  • Cut out the word cards and place them in a real cap or one of the paper/cloth caps.
  • Have the children choose the word cards one at a time and help them read the word on the card.
  • Let the children wrap each word in a scrap of paper or cloth.

More Practice
Read target words in a text

  • Read the Make a Cap target text together with the children.
  • Have the children underline the words that end in -ap.
  • Repeat with the Let’s Wrap a Cap! target text.

Write about the activity using target words/patterns

  • Give the children a paper and pencil and have them write -ap words from dictation: cap, snap, tap, gap, nap, rap, lap.
  • Engage the children in writing about their experience using sentence completion prompts and target words from the activity (support as needed).
    • Examples of sentence completion prompts:
      • I have a _____ (cap) with _____ (snaps), _____ (straps), and _____ (flaps).
      • I can wrap my _____ (cap) in a _____ (scrap) of cloth.

SEEL Target Texts

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Make a Cap

Make a cap.
Put on flaps, straps, and snaps.
Snap flaps on the cap. 
Snap straps on the cap.
Snap snaps on the straps.
A cap with flaps, straps, and snaps!

Let's Wrap a Cap

Let’s wrap a cap!
Get a scrap of paper.
Put the paper in your lap.
Put a cap on the scrap of paper.
Flap the paper over the cap.
Make another flap.
It’s a snap!
Put the cap wrapped in a scrap in your lap.
It’s a snap to wrap a cap!

Printouts

SEEL At Home

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Print

Objective 
Read and write words that end in -ap.

Materials

  • Cap pattern
  • Scraps of fabric or paper
  • Small pieces of paper

Activity: Make a Cap

  • Help your child make a cap with flaps and straps out of scrap fabric or paper:

    • Using the cap pattern or working freehand, cut a circle of fabric or paper.
    • Cut a slit from the edge to the center of the circle and wrap the fabric or paper to make a shallow cone (cap).
    • Cut out the flaps and attach them to both sides of the cap.
    • Cut 2 straps of fabric or paper and attach them to the bottoms of the flaps.
  • As you work together, use -ap words talk to your child about what you are doing (e.g.; Snap a flap to the cap.).
  • Play a game where one person puts the cap on their head and says the beginning sound of an -ap word, then the other person says -ap, and then together you say the whole word (e.g., c + ap = cap).
  • Have your child write several -ap words (e.g., cap, tap, map, nap, sap, gap) on small pieces of paper and attach them to the cap.

 

 

Cap-pattern

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.B: Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.D: Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words. (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/

Objective

Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ap to make words such as cap, flap, snap, and strap.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • cap
  • wrap
  • scrap
  • flap
  • snap
  • strap

Materials:

  • Cap pattern graphic
  • Scraps of paper and cloth
  • Word blending cards 
  • How to make a cap instructions
  • Where is My Cap? target text 
  • Let's Wrap a Cap! target text 
  • Book: Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina (1987, HarperCollins) (optional) 

Overview 
The children will wrap caps as they add sounds to the -ap ending to make words such as cap, snap, flap, scrap, and wrap.

Literacy Activities

Make caps

  • Read Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina (optional).
  • Give the children the cap pattern and have them label the parts of the cap by writing cap, snap, or flap on the corresponding parts.
  • Demonstrate how to make a cap using the instructions provided.
    • As you attach the strap and snaps with the stapler, repeat the word “snap” each time.

Wrap a cap and pass a cap

  • Let the children wrap the caps in scraps of paper or cloth.
  • Play a "pass the cap" game with children.
  • Have the children sit in a circle and take turns passing a paper cap.
  • As children get the cap, have them say a new word that ends in -ap by changing the beginning sound.
  • Have the children write each new word on the paper cap.

More Practice
Identify, blend, and manipulate sounds

  • With word blending cards, have the children make new words by changing the vowel or either of the consonants:
    • Change the beginning sound(s): cap → tap; lap → nap; snap → flap
    • Change the vowel: flap → flip; snap → snip; cap → cop
    • Change the ending sound: cap → cat; rap → rag; tap → tan

Read target words in a text

  • Read the Where Is My Cap? target text together with the group. 
  • Have the children underline the words that end in -ap.
  • Repeat with the Let's Wrap a Cap! target text

Write about the activity using target words

  • Give each child a whiteboard and have them write words from dictation, changing one or two letters each time to make a new word: sap → nap → snap → snip → lip → lap → cap → cat → rat → rap → tap.

 

 

Instructions: How to Make a Cap

  1. Using the cap graphic as a pattern, cut out each piece. 

  2. Cut a slit to the center of the circle and wrap the paper to make a shallow cone.

  3. Cut out the flaps and attach them to both sides of the cap.

  4. Cut out the straps and snaps and attach them to the cap.

SEEL Target Texts

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Let's Wrap a Cap

Let's wrap a cap!
Get a scrap of paper.
Put the paper in your lap.
Put a cap on the scrap of paper.
Flap the paper over the cap.
Make another flap.
It's a snap!
Put the cap wrapped in a scrap in your lap.
It's a snap to wrap a cap!

Where Is My Cap

Where is my cap?
Have you seen my cap?
My cap has a strap.
Where is my cap with a strap?
My cap has flaps.
Have you seen my cap with flaps and a strap?
My cap has snaps.
Where is my cap with snaps, flaps, and a strap?
I see my cap!
I love my cap with snaps, flaps, and a strap.

Printouts

SEEL At Home

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Print

Objective 
Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ap to make words such as cap, flap, snap, and strap.


Materials

  • Cap pattern graphic
  • Scrap of fabric or paper, scissors, stapler or tape, pencil


Activity: Make a Cap

  • Help your child make a cap with flaps and straps out of scrap fabric or paper.
  • Using the cap graphic as a pattern, cut a circle of fabric or paper. Cut a slit to the center of the circle and wrap the fabric or paper to make a shallow cone (cap).
  • Cut two half circle flaps and attach them to both sides of the cap.
  • Cut two straps of fabric or paper and attach them to the cap.
  • Say phrases with the -ap words as you work together (e.g.; Snap a flap to the cap.).
  • Play a game with the cap in which one person puts the cap on their head. The person with the cap will say only the beginning sound of an -ap word and the other person must quickly say the -ap ending. Take turns wearing the cap.
  • Have your child change the /c/ in cap to /t/ then blend the new sound with the -ap ending to make the word tap. Repeat with other words (e.g., rap, sap, lap, gap, nap).
  • The activity can be repeated several times. 
 

cap-pattern


Print

Objective

Blend a beginning consonant or consonant blend with -ap to make words such as cap, flap, snap, and strap.

Materials:

  • Cap pattern graphic
  • Scraps of fabric or paper
  • Scissors

Activity: Make a Cap

  • Help your child make a cap with flaps and straps out of scrap fabric or paper by following the instructions.
  • Say phrases with the -ap words as you work together (e.g., "Snap a flap to the cap.").
  • Play a game with the cap and have you or your child put the cap on.
  • The person with the cap will say only the beginning sound of the word and the other person must quickly say the -ap ending. 
  • Take turns wearing the cap.
  • Have your child change the /c/ in cap to /t/ then blend the new sound with the -ap ending to make the word tap.
  • Repeat with other words (e.g., rap, sap, lap, gap, nap).
  • The activity can be repeated several times.

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.D: Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.C: Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/