Get the Pet to the Vet

Objective

Read and write words that end in –et.

Lesson Plan

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Target Words:

  • pet
  • get
  • vet
  • wet
  • net
  • let

Materials:

  • Pictures of pets (see below)
  • "Vet" sign (see below)
  • Pretend vet tools (optional)
  • Word blending cards (see below)
  • Can a Cat be a Pet? target text (see below)
  • Which Pet Likes to Get Wet? target text (see below)
  • My Pet Named Jet target text (see below)

State and model the objective
Tell the children that they will read and write words that end with –et: pet, met, get, vet, wet, net, yet, let.

Practice the skill within an activity
Decide who can be a pet

  • Read the target text Can a Cat be a Pet? (see below).
  • Discuss what kinds of animals make good pets.
  • Tell the children that a good pet might be one they could let into their house or keep in the yard.
  • Write “Animals I would let get in my house or yard” on the board and make a list of animals that would make good pets.
  • Write “Animals I would not let get in my house or yard” on the board and make a list of animals that would not make good pets.

Meet pets

  • Read the target text Which Pet Likes to Get Wet? (see below).
  • Tell the children they will get to meet pretend pets.
  • Let the children choose a pet (see below) and take turns asking, “Have you met my pet yet?”
  • Have the children tell if their pet likes to get wet or if it does not like to get wet.
  • Let each child name their pretend pet with a silly name that ends with –et (e.g. Jet, Det, Fet, Zet, etc.).
  • Have each child write the silly name they chose on the paper pet.

Get the pet to the vet

  • Set up the "Vet" sign at one end of the room (see below).
  • Explain that when you get a new pet, the vet needs to check the pet.
  • Let the children choose a pet (see below) and take the pet to the "Vet" sign.
  • Let the children take turns being the vet who helps each pet.
  • Encourage each vet to make comments using –et words such as the following:
    • This is the best pet yet.
    • This pet is set.
    • Let me check this pet.
    • I bet this pet is a great pet.
    • This is a pet that likes to get wet.
    • This pet looks like it can run as fast as a jet.

Apply the skill
Identify, blend and manipulate sounds

  • With word blending cards (see below), have the children make new words by changing the vowel or either of the consonants:
    • pet → vet, met wet, get let, set yet
    • pet pen, let led, met men, jet Jen
    • vet vat, get got, set sit, pet pat

Read target words/patterns introduced in the activity

  • Read the target text My Pet Named Jet (see below) together with the children.
  • Read the text again, fading support.
  • Have the children underline the words that end in –et.

Write about the activity using target words/patterns

  • Play a “get the pet to the vet” game with children.
    • Have the children sit in a circle and take turns passing a pet (see below) around the circle.
    • As children get the pet, have them say a new word that ends in –et.
    • Write each new word on the board.
    • When the pet gets all the way around the circle, let the last child get the pet to the vet. 
    • Repeat the game, but this time, have children write each word on the back of the pet picture.
    • Give the children a paper and pencil and have them write words from dictation: pet, vet, met, get, let, set, bet, wet, net, yet.
    • Give the children a whiteboard and have them write words from dictation, changing one or two letters each time to make a new word: pet, pit, pot, not, net, met, men, pen, pan, pat, sat, set, yet.

SEEL Target Texts

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My Pet Named Jet

I have a pet.
His name is Jet. 
He is as black as a dog can get.
He can run fast.
He can run as fast as a jet.
He is as fast as a dog can get.
 
Yesterday my pet got cold and wet.
Poor pet!
I took my pet to the vet.
The vet said, don’t fret!
 
Jet is as good as a dog can get.
He is the best pet I’ve ever met.
That Jet is some pet!

Which Pet Likes to Get Wet?

Cats do not like to get wet.
Some dogs do like to get wet.
But some dogs do not like to get wet.
And some dogs like to get a little wet.
 
Birds like to get wet.
Birds like to get a little wet.
 
Fish like to get wet. 
Fish like to get really wet. 
Fish need to be wet.

Can a Cat be a Pet?

A cat can be a pet.
A dog can be a pet.
A fish can be a pet.
A bird can be a pet.
 
I can let a pet cat, dog, fish, or bird in my house.
 
What kind of animal cannot be a pet?
A lion cannot be a pet.
A bear cannot be a pet.
A giraffe cannot be a pet.
I cannot let a lion, bear, or giraffe in my house.
 

Printouts

SEEL At Home

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Print

Objective
Read and write words that end with -et.

Materials

  • My Pet Named Jet text (see below)
  • Pet picture cards (see below)

Activity: Get the Pet to the Vet

  • Read the text My Pet named Jet with your child. Help your child read and underline all of the -et words in the text. Make a list of words that end with -et.
  • Help your child make a sign that says "vet".
  • Cut out and shuffle the pet pictures, then divide the pictures equally between all players.
  • Each player will place his or her cards face down in a pile in front of them. Each player will take turns as they turn his or her top card over in the pile.
  • If the pictures from two consecutive players match, shout "Get the pet to the vet!" Whoever shouts it first will run the two pets to the vet by putting them on the vet sign.
  • Repeat until there are no pet cards left.
  • The activity can be repeated several times.

 

Pet-Named-Jet-text

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Pet-Picture-Cards

Standards

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.B: Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.D: Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words. (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

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