Let's Get Set

Objective

Read and write words that end in -et.

Lesson Plan

See More

Target Words:

  • let
  • get
  • set
  • forget
  • fret
  • bet
  • yet

Materials:

  • Real or pretend baguette or loaf of bread (see below)
  • Let’s Get Set! reader’s theatre scripts (see target text below)
  • Letter cards (see below)
  • Book: Nanette’s Baguette by Mo Willems 

State and model the objective 
Tell the children that they will act out a play about a baguette (a long loaf of bread) and read and write words that end in -et, such as get, let, set, bet, yet and forget.  

Practice the skill within an activity

Read the book Nanette’s Baguette

  • Ask the children if they have ever had to get something at the store.
  • Read the book Nanette’s Baguette by Mo Willems to the children and explain that a baguette is a long loaf of bread.
  • Introduce the Let’s Get Set! reader’s theatre script, based on the Nannette’s Baguette book (see the script below).
  • Divide the children into four groups and assign each group a character’s part to read (i.e., the mom’s part, child 1’s part, child 2’s part, or the clerk’s part). 
  • Read the script aloud together (see below), having each group read its part.
  • After reading the script, invite a few of the children to act out the parts while the other children listen for words that end in -et.
  • Ask the children what words they heard that end in -et. 

Apply the skill

Read target words in a text

  • Engage the children in simultaneously reading the Let’s Get Set! script (see below) with you and then read it again, fading support.
  • Ask the children what words they found that end in -et and write them on the board. 

Identify, blend and manipulate sounds

  • Let the children make a target word (e.g. get) from letter cards (see below) and then let them make different words by changing either of the consonants or the vowel.
    • Change the beginning sound(s): get met; met let; bet wet
    • Change the vowel sound: pet  pat; get  got; bet →​​​​​​​ bit
    • Change the ending sound(s): pet →​​​​​​​ pen; get →​​​​​​​ gel; bet →​​​​​​​ beg
  • For each of the words the children make, have them produce the sounds for each letter and then blend those sounds back into the word.

Write about the activity using target words and phrases 

  • Display the target words on a word wall.
  • Refer the children to the -et words on the board and have the children write some ideas from the lesson activity or target text (e.g., Let’s get set to jet.).

SEEL Target Texts

See More

Let's Get Set!

*Reader's Theatre script
Based on Nanette's Baguette by Mo Willems
 
(At home)
Mom:  Want to get a baguette?
Children:  You bet!
Mom:  Get set.
 
(On the way to the shop)
Child 1:  Are we there yet?  
Child 2:  Not yet.
Child 1:  There yet?
Child 2:  Not yet!
Child 1:  There!  We can get a baguette!
Child 2:   Get set to get a baguette.
 
(To the store clerk)
Child 1:  Can I get a baguette?
Clerk:  You bet!   Here is your baguette.
 
(On the way home)
Children:  Yum!  Yum!  
Child 1:  Oh no!  No baguette.  We ate the baguette.
Child 2:  Should we fret?
Child 1:  Will Mom get upset?
 
(At home)
Child 1:  Mom, we do not have the baguette.
Child 2:  Don’t be upset.
Mom:  Did you forget?
Child 1:  No, we ate the baguette.
Child 2:  Can we get another baguette?
Mom:   Yes. Don’t fret. Don’t be upset. Just get set to get another baguette.
 

Printouts

Standards

See More
  1. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.B: Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.
  2. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.D: Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

http://education.byu.edu/seel/library/